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Scotch.io:
Implementing Smart Search with Laravel and Typeahead.js
Jul 14, 2016 @ 12:12:41

The Scotch.io blog has posted a tutorial combining Laravel and the Typeahead.js library to create a "smart search" in your application. Most of the tutorial centers around the Typeahead.js code though, so with a bit of tweaking it could sit on top of just about any framework out there.

In a big web application, like an online market or a social network, one of the most important parts of the app is the search functionality. Having a great search feature will help your users find the right content(users, products, articles) quickly and easily.

In this tutorial, we are going to learn, how to enhance your default search field in your site with real-time suggestions from the database. We will be using Laravel, jQuery and Typeahead (Bloodhound as the suggestion engine) to implement the smart search and Bootstrap for the styling. So, let's get started.

He starts off by introducing the Typeahead.js library and the Bloodhound suggestion engine. He shows the installation (either via Bower, standalone download or included from a CDN) and a simple template with a search form and other Javascript requirements included. The tutorial covers some of the options you can set, what kinds of datasets it can work with and templates to use for the results. Next up, he brings in a default Laravel project and a "search" endpoint that queries user data and returns a JSON dataset of the results. The two pieces are then finally tied together with a few updates to the Javascript already created.

tagged: smart search tutorial laravel typeaheadjs javascript bloodhound

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/implementing-smart-search-with-laravel-and-typeahead-js

Dotdev.co:
Writing advanced Eloquent search query filters
Jun 15, 2016 @ 11:10:04

In a new post from the Dotdev.co site there's a tutorial from Amo Chohan helping you write advanced search query filters for Eloquent in your Laravel application.

I recently needed to implement a search feature in an events management project I was building. What begun as a few simple options (searching by name, e-mail etc), turned into a pretty large set of parameters.

Today, I’ll go over the process I went through and how I built a flexible and scalable search system. For those of you who are eager to see the final code, head over to the Git repository to see the code.

He starts off by outlining what he'll be creating and where the need comes from for this more advanced filtering. He uses a company-wide calendar example with events and meetings/clients shown for all users. He defines the filters he knows he'll want to search by and the models relating to the data needed for those queries. He then spends the rest of the post going through the code needed to implement the filtering, starting with a rough (but working) version and refactoring from there. He moves away from the procedural method of applying filters to a query object directly and over to "applying" them more dynamically using a set of filter instances via a Decorator design pattern approach.

tagged: advanced eloquent filter search decorator apply refactor tutorial

Link: https://dotdev.co/writing-advanced-eloquent-search-query-filters-de8b6c2598db#.16sfoe3a8

Symfony Blog:
The New Symfony Documentation Search Engine
Apr 29, 2016 @ 10:49:27

In an effort to improve their "developer experience" (DX) around using the Symfony framework the development team has introduced new searching functionality to help more effectively find what you're looking for in the expansive Symfony documentation.

Symfony boasts one of the largest documentation pools ever written for an Open- Source project. Considering the ten different Symfony versions (from 2.0 to master) and including the code samples, Symfony Documentation has around 3.6 million words, more than three times the word count of the entire Harry Potter series.

They share some of the things they learned around creating a search engine ("it's hard") and what they ultimately ended up using - the Algolia service. The post talks about how they indexed the current documentation and broke it up into "chunks" of meaningful content. They also include the simple Javascript they use that links the search field to the Algolia service and renders the results using a view partial.

The proof of concept for the new search engine was a success and we decided to stop the ElasticSearch integration and stick with Algolia. The new search engine is greatly faster than the previous one and the search results are more accurate and relevant.
tagged: symfony documentation search engine new algolia service

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/the-new-symfony-documentation-search-engine

Cal Evans:
Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television…But Can Apparently Say In Code
Apr 01, 2016 @ 11:49:39

In a lighthearted post for this April Fool's Cal Evans has released some interesting research ("research" here is "searching on GitHub") for the statistics behind the use of profanity in code. (As you'd expect, there's profanity in the post, so don't read if you're offended by that).

The late great George Carlin had many awesome comedy skits. One of them – possibly his most famous – is “Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television” from the comedy album “Class Clown”. In it he gives his list of seven words that – at the time – were inappropriate for over the air broadcast in the United States.

I thought it would be fun – if for no other reason than clickbait – to run the 7 dirty words against Github to see who is using what, and where. I took screenshots so that you can see each word and which languages use it the most. I also list PHP’s rating for each word out of the top 10 languages.

While I won't go into the list of actual words in this post, it's interesting to see which languages come out on top for certain words. In most cases PHP came in somewhere in the middle with a few exceptions either way.

tagged: profanity words code results search github ranking

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2016/04/01/seven-words-you-can-never-say-on-television-but-can-apparently-say-in-code/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building a Basic Video Search App with Vimeo’s API and Slim
Nov 24, 2015 @ 12:02:15

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted showing you how to integrate the Vimeo API with Slim to create a simple web application allowing you to search for videos matching a simple query string.

In this tutorial, you’ll get to know the basics of the Vimeo API. With it, you can fetch information on a specific user or get information on the videos uploaded by the user. If the video is private, you can only get it from the API if the user has given permission to your app.

They start with helping you create a new application on the Vimeo developer site and introduce you to the API playground for trying out various API queries and fetching the results. Following this the tutorial starts in on the application itself, helping you get a Slim application up and running with Twig templating and the Vimeo API library. They bootstrap the application with your Vimeo application credentials and how to log into the API via access tokens. The flow then allows the user to connect their Vimeo account to your Slim application. With this connection in place the user can then view their profile information and execute a search on the "videos" endpoint with a simple query string.

tagged: tutorial api vimeo video slim framework search results apiplayground application

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-a-basic-video-search-app-with-vimeos-api-and-slim/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introduction to Elasticsearch in PHP
Aug 04, 2015 @ 09:31:05

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted an introduction to using Elasticsearch in your PHP applications. In it author Wern Ancheta covers some of the basics of this powerful tool and helps you get an example script up and running for testing.

In this tutorial, we’re going to take a look at Elasticsearch and how we can use it in PHP. Elasticsearch is an open-source search server based on Apache Lucene. We can use it to perform super fast full-text and other complex searches. It also includes a REST API which allows us to easily issue requests for creating, deleting, updating and retrieving of data.

He starts by helping you get Elasticsearch itself installed via the apt-get package manager (may slightly differ depending on your OS of choice) and tested with a simple web-based request to the port the server is running on. With the server set up he then moves on to the PHP aspect, helping you get the elasticsearch library installed via Composer and creating a new client instance. He then includes code examples of some of the main operations you'll perform with entries in the Elasticsearch instance: inserting a document, updating a document, deleting and - of course - searching for documents matching certain simple and more complex criteria.

tagged: introduction tutorial elasticsearch install library insert update delete search

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/introduction-to-elasticsearch-in-php/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Turning a Crawled Website into a Search Engine with PHP
Jul 06, 2015 @ 10:19:43

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their "Powerful Custom Search Engines with Diffbot" series with part two showing how to take the Diffbot results and make them searchable.

In the previous part of this tutorial, we used Diffbot to set up a crawljob which would eventually harvest SitePoint’s content into a data collection, fully searchable by Diffbot’s Search API. We also demonstrated those searching capabilities by applying some common filters and listing the results. [...] In this part, we’ll build a GUI simple enough for the average Joe to use it, in order to have a relatively pretty, functional, and lightweight but detailed SitePoint search engine. What’s more, we won’t be using a framework, but a mere total of three libraries to build the entire application.

For those interested in the end result, you can skip to the demo. Otherwise, they'll walk you through the full process:

  • Bootstrapping the environment and needed libraries
  • Creating a simple "home" page with a Diffbot client
  • Creating the frontend interface (a form allowing for various search terms)
  • Making the Javascript to catch the form submission
  • Adding CSS to style the page
  • Building out the PHP backend to perform the different search types (author and keywords)

Finally he ties it all together and create the output of the search results, providing links to each of the matching pages, posting date, author information and a brief summary. He ends the post with a look at paginating the results via a "PaginationHelper" class that will drop a navigation item at the bottom of the results and handle moving from page to page, interfacing with the Diffbot client.

tagged: search engine diffbot tutorial series part2 results crawled website

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/turning-crawled-website-search-engine-php/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Crawling and Searching Entire Domains with Diffbot
Jul 02, 2015 @ 09:41:39

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted, the first part in a new series, showing you how to create a "powerful custom search engine" with the help of the Diffbot service. In this first part they help you get everything you need set up (including a VM to run it from).

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to build a custom SitePoint search engine that far outdoes anything WordPress could ever put out. We’ll be using Diffbot as a service to extract structured data from SitePoint automatically, and this matching API client to do both the searching and crawling. I’ll also be using my trusty Homestead Improved environment for a clean project, so I can experiment in a VM that’s dedicated to this project and this project alone.

He walks you through each step of the process, first creating the "crawljob" script and then executing it to gather the results. He also shows how to show this information via a simple GUI when searches are performed. A Diffbot PHP client library makes creating the crawljob simpler and lets you configure things like max number of items to crawl, patterns to match and what URLs to follow on the pages. Running the script creates the job which is then executed immediately. The same library makes search the data simpler too, using a "search" method along with some special tagging, and returning a JSON result with the matching records.

tagged: crawl domain diffbot search engine part1 series tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/crawling-searching-entire-domains-diffbot/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Youtube Videos in PHP: Categories, Search and Suggestions
May 20, 2015 @ 11:47:14

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series showing how to integrate content from the YouTube API into your application with this new tutorial. It covers the use of categories, searching and suggestions.

In the first part, we introduced the Youtube API and built a small demo to list the most popular videos on Youtube. In this part, we will extend our application to have search functionality, and we’ll also list the available categories on Youtube to let the user narrow down their area of interest.

He starts with with the updates you'll need to make to the routes and controllers for the "categories" functionality and the API call needed to popular the content. He updates the "videos" page to show the category information and integrate the category into the pagination. Next up is the search, allowing the users to find videos based on a search string. The search route/controller/view functionality is added as well. He ends the post talking about a way to extend the demo and advice to keep an eye on quotas and implementing cache.

tagged: tutorial series part2 youtube api categories search suggestion

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/youtube-videos-php-categories-search-suggestions/

Phillip Shipley:
Creating a PHP Nexmo API Client using Guzzle Web Service Client – Part 3
Apr 10, 2015 @ 09:25:40

Phillip Shipley has posted the next part in his series about making a client with Guzzle for the Nexmo API. In this latest post he adds functionality to the client made in previous parts of the series (part1, part two) to allow for message searching.

Now let’s go ahead and add another SMS related API to show how easy it is since we already have the base client and description in place. Nexmo also has APIs to search for a specific message, multiple messages based on some criteria, as well as for rejected messages. Let’s go ahead and add these three interfaces to our SMS description and see what it takes.

He includes the code to add to the current client and configuration to enable the "SearchMessage" functionality and the correct handling of the result. He shows how to update the client class with a new "searchMessage" method and the searching of the rejections with the Insight API.

tagged: nexmo api tutorial client guzzle series part3 webservice search rejected

Link: http://www.phillipshipley.com/2015/04/creating-a-php-nexmo-api-client-using-guzzle-web-service-client-part-3/