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AWS PHP Development:
Testing Webhooks Locally for Amazon SNS
April 08, 2014 @ 11:33:07

In a previous post the AWS for PHP blog showed how to set up webhooks for handling the callbacks from their SNS messaging service. In this next part of the series they continue the process, showing how you can test these hooks locally without needing to actually send the messages. This eliminates the need to deploy to a public-facing server just to test the hooks every time you need an update.

In a recent post, I talked about Receiving Amazon SNS Messages in PHP. I showed you how to use the SNS Message and MessageValidator classes in the AWS SDK for PHP to handle incoming SNS messages. The PHP code for the webhook is easy to write, but can be difficult to test properly, since it must be deployed to a server in order to be accessible to Amazon SNS. I'll show you how you can actually test your code locally with the help of a few simple tools.

Using PHP's own built-in webserver and a tool called ngrok to tunnel from the public internet to a local server. He includes the commands to set up the PHP script directory, the code to intercept the POSTed data from the request, validate it and send the subscription confirmation request. He helps you create an SNS "topic" through the management console and walks you through a sample test request while tailing the logs.

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aws amazon sns webhook testing local server ngrok tutorial

Link: http://blogs.aws.amazon.com/php/post/Tx2CO24DVG9CAK0/Testing-Webhooks-Locally-for-Amazon-SNS

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Piping Emails to a Laravel Application
February 17, 2014 @ 09:13:48

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial posted about piping emails to Laravel (well, a Laravel-based application). He shows how to have your application take data in from the current input, parse it and insert the data into a database.

In project management or support management tools, you will see this a lot: you can reply to an email message and it is automatically visible in a web application. Somehow, these tools were able to get those email messages right into their system. In this article, we are going to have a look at how we can pipe emails to our Laravel 4 application.

He walks you through the creation of an Artisan command, "email.parse", and using the PHP MIME Mail Parser library to extract data. He gets the to, from, title and message contents from the email and shows how to work with attachments too. Finally, he shows how to set up the mail server to pipe the incoming email though the PHP script for parsing.

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email parse message laravel tutorial mail server

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/piping-emails-laravel-application/

Ben Ramsey:
The Fall of PEAR and the Rise of Composer
November 27, 2013 @ 09:17:35

Ben Ramsey has an interesting post to his site today looking at what he calls the Fall of PEAR and the rise of Composer when it comes to package management in the PHP community.

PEAR's biggest selling-point -the curation of packages by a governed community - was also its biggest problem. There was no choice, and things moved slowly. If a package stagnated in development, I couldn't find another actively supported one to solve the same need. In theory, the maintenance of the package could be taken over by someone else, but this didn't always happen, and contributing patches was not clear or easy.

Ben talks about how, despite the PEAR development's best efforts, the proposed new package manager (Pyrus and PEAR2) couldn't keep up. Then, from a discussion had at a conference, the idea of a standards group was formed, the PHP-FIG, and the first standard soon followed, PSR-0 for autoloading. With this in hand and becoming widely adopted, a new tool was created to make it easier to share and install packages with this new standard - Composer.

Composer is what PEAR should have been. Through Packagist, Composer is the democratization of PHP userland libraries. Many libraries in the repository implement similar functionality, but through a show of popularity, the community self-selects the packages that are of the best quality. [...] In just a few short years, Composer has revitalized the PHP community and changed the way we do development.
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fall pear rise composer psr0 phpfig package management

Link: http://benramsey.com/blog/2013/11/the-fall-of-pear-and-the-rise-of-composer/

Gonzalo Ayuso:
How to run a Web Server from a PHP application
November 11, 2013 @ 11:53:06

Gonzalo Ayuso has put together a post showing how (by implementing the Reactor design pattern) he created a simple web server inside a PHP application. It combines a few Symfony2 components and the React library to build a simple server in a bit more programatic way.

Normally we deploy our PHP applications in a webserver (such as apache, nginx, ). I used to have one apache webserver in my personal computer to play with my applications, but from time to now I prefer to use PHP's built-in webserver for my experiments. It's really simple. [...] With PHP we cannot do it. Sure? That assertion isn't really true. We can do it. I've just create one small library to do it in two different ways. First running the built-in web server and also running one React web server.

The idea is that all that would be needed is a stand-alone PHP script that could be run anywhere and start up its own web server, no other software required. He includes a simplified version of the example, showing how to make servers with both React and PHP's own server. He also includes an example of a basic Silex application that uses it as well as some benchmarks (with Apache ab) for each of the implementations and their request/response times on average for simple and Silex requests.

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builtin webserver server example react silex

Link: http://gonzalo123.com/2013/11/11/how-to-run-a-web-server-from-a-php-application/

Rob Allen:
Setting up PHP & MySQL on OS X Mavericks
November 04, 2013 @ 09:52:25

For those that have made the switch to OSX Mavericks and are wondering how to get PHP and MySQL into a working state, Rob Allen has posted a quick guide to getting it all set up.

With OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Apple chose to ship PHP 5.4.17. This is how to set it up from a clean install of Mavericks. Note: If you don't want to use the built-in PHP or want to use version 5.5, then these are [other] alternatives: a binary package from Liip, Zend Server and a Homebrew install.

He provides all the commands you'll need to get things up and running including checking file/directory permissions, installing MySQL and using the command line to work with Apache (no more "Web Sharing"). He also includes the configuration changes to be made to the php.ini including how to enable Xdebug. There's lots of other good things included in the guide as well like setting up Composer, PHPUnit and how to compile a few handy extensions.

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osx mavericks mysql install configure apache extension pear pecl phpunit

Link: http://akrabat.com/computing/setting-up-php-mysql-on-os-x-mavericks/

Zend:
Apigility Progress report zf-mvc-auth, packagist, and PHP's built-in web server
November 01, 2013 @ 15:52:11

In a new post to the Apigility forums today Matthew Weier O'Phinney has announced the release of an authentication/authorization component for the recently announced project from Zend. Apigility is a Zend Framework-based tool for easily constructing and managing an API.

We've been working hard on Apigility since ZendCon, and have released some more code into the wild. zf-mvc-auth exists to provide both authentication and authorization for your APIs; in fact, it's a bit of a general-purpose library for ZF2 MVC apps! Right now, we support HTTP basic and digest authentication out of the box, and will be working next on OAuth support. Authorization is done by default via ZendPermissionsAcl, as we discovered a problem with using RBAC: RBAC is deny-by-default, which does not work when you want an open-by-default schema. You may opt-in to deny-by-default, as well as mark individual services as requiring permission by default. Finally, you have the option of denying/allowing per HTTP method of a service as well.

You can find out more details about this functionality in this quick screencast. The zf-apgility module depends on this new zf-mvc-auth module, so it will be included and available by default in your APIs. In that same post Matthew also talks about the listing of the Apigility packages on Packagist service and a note for those wanting to use the built-in HTTP server to run the tool (a PHP version dependency).

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apigility progress zendframework mvc authentication authorization packagist http server

Link: https://groups.google.com/a/zend.com/forum/#!topic/apigility-users/_mOPkxxmGYI

Gonzalo Ayuso:
Playing with event dispatcher and Silex. Sending logs to a remote server.
October 22, 2013 @ 09:44:57

Gonzalo Ayuso as a new post today showing the results of some of his testing with the event dispatcher and Silex to send logs to a remote server.

Today I continue playing with event dispatcher and Silex. Now I want to send a detailed log of our Kernel events to a remote server. We can do it something similar with Monolog, but I want to implement one working example hacking a little bit the event dispatcher. Basically we're going to create one Logger class (implementing PSR-3 of course).

He includes the sample code defining a "Logger" class that takes whatever message sent to it and pushes it into a given socket resource. He also creates a provider for the logger to implement it in the example and registers it with the event dispatcher. He hooks it into the request, get controller, terminate and exception events. On the other side he uses React to make a basic server to listen on port 4000 for the incoming log data.

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silex event dispatcher remote server log logger psr3

Link: http://gonzalo123.com/2013/10/21/playing-with-event-dispatcher-and-silex-sending-logs-to-a-remote-server/

Kevin Schroder:
What SSL $_SERVER variables are available in PHP
September 02, 2013 @ 09:24:04

Kevin Schroeder has shared the results of a question he wanted answered when it came to PHP with a HTTPS (SSL) connection - which of the $_SERVER variables are available.

I found myself wondering what HTTPS variables were available in the $_SERVER variable today and didn't find a specific list (and didn't have mod_ssl installed). So as a public service, here is what my server says.

Thanks to some of the additional handling and information the SSL connection provides to PHP, there's several additional variables including things like:

  • SSL_PROTOCOL
  • HTTPS (set to "on")
  • SSL_COMPRESS_METHOD
  • SSL_CLIENT_VERIFY
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ssl server superglobal variable

Link: http://www.eschrade.com/page/what-ssl-_server-variables-are-available-in-php/

BinaryTides.com:
Setup Nginx + php-FPM + apc + MariaDB on Debian 7 - The perfect LEMP server
August 09, 2013 @ 11:58:39

On the BinaryTides.com site today there's a tutorial they've posted walking you through the full install process to get Nginx, PHP-FPM (with APC) and MariaDb working together on Debian, complete with configuration changes and all the commands you'll need.

Debian is a great choice for setting up linux webservers. According to current stats it is the most popular server OS followed closely by centos. I am a great fan of the apt/dpkg/gdebi commands, which make it so easy to install and update packages on the system. To setup a complete functional php webserver, you need to install a couple of extra things which include a webserver and a database. In this post we shall be setting up nginx, php, php-fpm, apc and maridb.

The tutorial is broken up into three main steps, each with clarification of what's involved:

  • Install Nginx on Debian
  • Install php and php-fpm
  • Install MariaDB on Debian
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lemp server debian phpfpm mariadb apc

Link: http://www.binarytides.com/install-nginx-php-fpm-mariadb-debian

Alvaro Videla:
Using RabbitMQ in Unit Tests
May 01, 2013 @ 09:10:11

Alvaro Videla has a new post today showing how he used RabbitMQ in his unit testing runs with a small, quickly installed version of the server that can be removed once the tests are complete.

In this blog post I want to show you a very simple technique for using RabbitMQ in our Unit or Functional Tests. Let's say you wrote a bunch of tests for your RabbitMQ consumers and then it's time to run them. To do that you probably need to setup a RabbitMQ server just for tests with their own users and passwords, or you need to set up a whole new virtual host for your tests. [...] With a future release of RabbitMQ that we can already test on the nightlies website, we can run RabbitMQ without the need to install Erlang. We created a package that ships a stripped down version of Erlang together with the broker bits, so running RabbitMQ now is as easy as downloading a tarball, uncompressing it and starting the server.

With a combination of this more self-contained package and some listener handling through PHPUnit, they uncompress the tarball with a PHP script and start the server with the defined configuration. Then, once the tests are done, it cleans itself up and removes the entire server directory to make for a clean run the next time.

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rabbitmq standalone server erlang unittest phpunit

Link: http://videlalvaro.github.io/2013/04/using-rabbitmq-in-unit-tests.html


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