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David Müller:
Cross Domain AJAX Guide
Dec 10, 2012 @ 12:17:39

In his latest post David Müller covers some of the things to consider when working with cross-domain ajax requests including CORS and iframes.

As it is widely known, AJAX Requests are only possible if port, protocol and domain of sender and receiver are equal. [...] Having this cleared out, we will cover ways around this restriction.

He covers three main approaches to allowing these cross-domain requests (and some of the security implications that can come with them):

  • CORS (Cross Origin Resource Sharing)
  • JSONP (Javascript with a local domain callback)
  • Iframes

He also briefly mentions things like window.postMessage (HTML5) and the use of a backend script to proxy a request into your application's local code.

tagged: crossdomain ajax cors iframe jsonp tutorial introduction

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WebSpeaks.in:
Cross Domain Posting using PHP and JavaScript: ITS POSSIBLE!
Dec 21, 2010 @ 11:51:35

Ever been frustrated by the fact that your javascript code can't make JSON requests to sites under other other domains? Well, WebSpeaks.in has some happy news for you in the form of JSONP.

Well.....finally i have worked out how to post cross-domain data which is restricted by browser's security policies. What is it?? This will be used for posting AJAX requests via java-script to any web-service or web-page in any DOMAIN and also get back the results from there.

JSONP allows you to call a URL outside of the domain the script is running from with a callback. This callback lives in the calling script so, technically, it never leaves that scope. There's lots of other resources out there to help you implement it in your own code including jQuery and Prototype JSON handling.

tagged: crossdomain javascript jsonp tutorial

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SitePoint:
Silverlight and PHP, Part 2: Creating a Simple Twitter Client
Jul 08, 2010 @ 10:10:13

SitePoint has posted the second part of a series from Jordan Knight about creating a Twitter client by combining Silverlight and PHP (part one is here).

The application that we’ll build in this article will allow you to enter a Twitter search term, and display the tweets received in Silverlight. Unfortunately, this process isn’t as simple as loading a URL from Silverlight, because of something known as cross-domain access policy.

He talks some about the problem that this cross-domain access can cause for your scripts and how he used PHP to solve it. He created a simple web service that his Silverlight application could query in the same domain. This service did the call to Twitter and returned back the results to the waiting Silverlight app.

tagged: silverlight tutorial twitter search crossdomain

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