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Ian Cambridge:
Code Review: Single Responsibility Principle
Feb 23, 2017 @ 13:24:05

Ian Cambridge has put together a new post for his site focusing on the Single Responsibility Principle, one of the more well-known (and well understood) parts of the SOLID design principles.

Single Responsibility Principle (SRP) is probably one of the most well-known principles from SOLID. At its core is a desire to prevent classes from becoming overwhelming and bloated. While enabling the ability to change how a single thing works by only changing a single class. So the benefits of SRP are that you have an easier codebase to maintain since classes are less complex and when you wish to change something you only have to change a single class. In this blog, I will go through some ways to try and help avoid breaching SRP while doing code review.

He gives two examples and the code they might contain, breaking the SRP mentality. The first is a "manager" (or service) class that, while good in principle, usually ends up performing way too many operations than it should. The second is a "from usage" instance where the return of one method is being used as a parameter for another method in the same class. For each he talks about the problem with the current implementation and offers a suggestion or two of things to fix to make it adhere more to SRP ideals.

tagged: singleresponsibilityprinciple srp solid example code review

Link: http://blog.humblyarrogant.io/post/2017-02-21-code-review-single-responsibility-principle/

PHPMaster.com:
The Single Responsibility Principle
Nov 22, 2012 @ 11:58:06

On PHPMaster.com today Alejandro Gervasio has a new tutorial posted about the Single Responsibility Principle - a guideline that states that each class should only have one "area of concern" and not try to do to much.

One of the most notorious consequences of this rational associative process is that, at some point, we effectively end up creating classes that do too much. The so-called “God class” is quite possibly the most extreme and coarse example of a structure that packages literally piles of unrelated operations behind the fence of the same API, but there are other subtle, more furtive situations where assigning of multiple roles to the same class are harder to track down. [...] What the principle attempts to promote is that classes must always be designed to expose only one area of concern and the set of operations they define and implement must be aimed at fulfilling that concern in particular and nothing else.

He starts off with a typical violation of the principle, showing a class that not only handles user data but also includes the functions to work with the database directly as well (insert/update/delete). He refactors this into a few much more manageable classes - a mapping class to handle the database interaction and a "User" class representative of a true user object.

tagged: single responsibility principle srp class tutorial refactor

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