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NetTuts.com:
Protecting Your Keys From GitHub
Mar 05, 2015 @ 12:03:05

On the NetTuts.com site there's a new post talking about protecting your keys when using a public site like GitHub. This relates to an easy thing to forget - removing hard-coded credentials from code before pushing it public.

In December 2014, Slashdot ran an alarming story Bots Scanning GitHub To Steal Amazon EC2 Keys, based on developer and blogger Andrew Hoffman's experience trying out Ruby on Rails on Amazon with AWS S3. He inadvertently committed an application.yml file with his AWS keys. [...] It's an easy mistake and most of us have probably done a similar thing at one point or another. And it's not just AWS keys that are at risk. As our use of cloud-based services increases, the expanding use of a broad variety of service API keys can be leveraged by hackers and spammers alike.

He goes through a solution he's found to help protect those credentials, in this case working with the configuration of a Yii framework-based application. He starts with a mention of .gitignore but points out that it could have unexpected results from "quirks" in its handling. He suggests a different option - using a configuration file that lives someplace outside of the main git directory and can be referenced directly from inside the application. He provides two kinds of examples: one using a PHP-based configuration and another based on an INI file. He finishes the post with a mention about WordPress plugins and the fact that they're (usually) stored in a database and open to exposure if a SQL injection vulnerability is found.

tagged: github protect keys commit public exposure configuration file gitignore

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/protecting-your-keys-from-github--cms-23002

Lorna Mitchell:
Using Composer Without GitIgnoring Vendor/
Mar 12, 2014 @ 12:45:23

In her latest post Lorna Mitchell looks at a method, when using Composer and git, to fix an issue around subdirectories that are git repositories and git thinking they should be submodules instead.

Recent additions to the joind.in API have introduced some new dependencies so we decided we'd start using Composer to manage these - but we don't want to run composer unsupervised. I'm sure this will bring the rain of "just run composer install, it's probably mostly almost safe" criticism, but actually it's quite tricky to run Composer without excluding vendor/ from source control so I thought I'd share how we did it so that anyone who wants to do so can learn from my experience!

She starts by describing the usual use of Composer - making the "composer.json", running the install and see the "vendor" directory being added. When she tried to check in the dependencies, git gave her an error about wanting them to be submodules. Instead, she figured out a way to add a line to the .gitignore to have it disregard the "vendor/.git" directory, making it work as expected.

tagged: composer vendor install gitignore git

Link: http://www.lornajane.net/posts/2014/using-composer-without-gitignoring