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/Dev/Hell Podcast:
Episode 45 Single Quotes for Web Scale
May 30, 2014 @ 10:13:48

The latest episode of the /Dev/Hell podcast has officially been released, Episode #45: Single Quotes for Web Scale, as hosted by PHP community members Ed Finkler and Chris Hartjes (and joined by guest Steve Corona).

This week is all about PERSONAL BRANDING and WEB SCALE with special guest Steve Corona. We talk about Steve's book Scaling PHP. We also reminisce about the old days of Twitter API dev, until Steve humiliates Ed by not knowing what Spaz was.

Topics mentioned in this episode include the Scaling PHP book, Twitpic, double quotes versus single quotes in PHP and horizontal versus vertical scaling. You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 directly.

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Link: http://devhell.info/post/2014-05-28/single-quotes-for-web-scale/

Gonzalo Ayuso:
Scaling Silex applications (part II). Using RouteCollection
March 06, 2013 @ 09:21:31

Gonzalo Ayuso has posted a second part of his look at scaling Silex (here's part one). In this new article he shows how to use the RouteCollection functionality instead of defining the routes in the DI configuration.

In the post Scaling Silex applications I wanted to organize a one Silex application. In one comment Igor Wiedler recommended us to use RouteCollections instead of define the routes with a Symfony's Dependency Injection Container. Because of that I started to hack a little bit about it and here I show you my outcomes:

He includes example code for creating the application, setting up the main "routes.yml" file with some defaults and two other files for routes in other parts of the site - "api" and "blog". Then he makes the controllers related to these three sections with basic actions catching each of the routes. The source for the entire thing is over on github.

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silex scaling application tutorial routercollection yaml


Igor Wiedler:
Scaling a Silex code base
November 09, 2012 @ 10:55:04

Igor Wiedler has a new post to his site today talking about scaling Silex-based applications (a microframework based on Symfony components) and using it for more than just the basic applications.

One common misconception about silex and microframeworks in general is that they are only suited for small, simple apps, APIs and prototyping. Of course, those use cases are the main selling point, but they are by no means the limit of what is possible.

He shares some code that's the common "first steps" for someone using the framework, but points out a better way - moving your controller handling out into separate files instead. With a built-in feature of Silex, you can specify the "path" to another class file that will handle the request and return the response back to the main app. He also suggests extracting even more of the functionality out into "service" classes to handle the processing, cleaning up the controllers even more. He finishes off the post with a brief comparison between Silex and a full Symfony2 application, noting that Silex is a bit more "free form" when it comes to structure where Symfony2 apps are pretty well defined and have their conventions.

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Oracle Technology Network:
Scaling a PHP MySQL Web Application, Part 2
April 12, 2011 @ 13:28:05

On the Oracle Technology Network today, the part two of "Scaling PHP MySQL Web Applications" (from Eli White) has been published. Part one can be found here.

In Part 1 of this article, I explained the basic steps to move your application from a single server to a scalable solution for both PHP and MySQL. While most Web applications will never need to expand beyond the concepts presented in that article, eventually you may find yourself in a situation where the basic steps aren't enough. Here are some more advanced topics on how you might change your setup to support additional throughput, isolate "concerns" better, and take your scalability to the next level.

He starts with a look at database pooling and how it can not only help you on load balancing your application's resources but also in the caching of the requests. Different resources give different cache results and grouping those together makes life simpler (and faster) for your application. He also talks a a bit about sharding - vertical, manual horizontal and application level techniques.

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scaling application mysql database sharding pooling performance


Oracle Technology Network:
Scaling a PHP MySQL Web Application, Part 1
April 07, 2011 @ 08:27:58

The Oracle Technology Network has posted the first article in a series by Eli White looking at building a scalable PHP/MySQL web application.

Hopefully the most important lesson you can learn here is to understand what you will need to do to scale in the future. By knowing this, you can do only what you need at each phase of your project without "coding yourself into a corner", ending up in a situation where it's hard to take the next scalability step. [...] In this two-part article I will share some of the lessons learned, and take you step by step through a standard process of scaling your application.

He touches on a few different topics in this first part of the series - performance vs scalability, tuning your PHP installation and database load balancing through master/slave replication.

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scaling application tutorial mysql database tips


Josh Holmes' Blog:
Scaling WordPress on Microsoft
September 01, 2010 @ 11:16:04

Josh Holmes, just coming off of presenting at OpenCa.mp in Dallas, has posted his entire presentation to his blog for anyone that missed it and wants to catch up. He spoke about scaling WordPress on the Windows platform. He also includes a lot of content in the post that he wasn't able to get to during the presentation.

Now, on to my session itself. This was a fun session. I only had 30 minutes and I had about 3 hours of material so I've got a ton of stuff in these notes that I didn't cover in the session itself. The session is a take off a session that I did at MODxpo back in the spring. The talk itself is about 3-5 minutes of slides and the rest is all demos.

If you're looking for the actual slides, they're over on slideshare, but the real content - including the demos (and screenshots of them) are included. He talks about the Windows Platform Installer, the WinCache library and Windows Azure Data Storage.

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scaling wordpress microsoft iis wpi wincache azure opencamp2010 odc10


Brandon Savage's Blog:
Scaling Up Picking The Right Setup
March 31, 2009 @ 07:52:15

Brandon Savage has a few recommendations when it comes to taking your application to the next level - scaling it up to meet the needs of the masses using your application every day.

The modern age has brought us lots of new ways to take a growing site and scale it. From Amazon Web Services to cloud computing and grid computing, to Mosso and Akamai, there are lots of options we should consider. This article won't make a recommendation as to which you should pick; it will simply discuss what each service has to offer and leave it up to you.

He suggests four different alternatives to pick from when making the move up - the old standby of purchasing more hardware, making use of the Amazone Web Services, using a "cloud" like Mosso or implementing a Content Delivery Network to lighten the load and spread it out across a wider range of servers.

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scaling options amazonewebservices aws mosso cloud cdn hardware


Brandon Savage's Blog:
Scaling Up Baby Steps (a.k.a. Asking The Right Questions)
February 16, 2009 @ 10:29:10

In this new post to his (newly WordPress-ed) blog Brandon Savage looks at a consideration most developers think of too late and when their applications are already starting to bulge around the edges - scalability. It's the first part of this series.

Before we actually get started hacking on our code, let's make sure we've got the right questions asked and answered. We're going to need some resources, the help of others in our organization, and probably some understanding of the current system structure before we're successful in our goal. Some of these questions may seem mundane, and others will be extremely important. But we must ask and receive answers to all of them, so let's get started.

The questions touch on the topics of bottleneck sources, why scalability of the application is needed and what other services are out there that could do what I need without having to roll my own.

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scaling application question bottleneck reason service answer


Zend Developer Zone:
Scaling Day-By-Day
September 25, 2008 @ 10:20:02

Jayson Minard has a new post to the Zend Developer Zone talking about scaling your PHP applications - some of the best practices to follow that can make it easier on you.

As a consultant, I deal with companies of all sizes. From new startups all the way up to large conglomerates. And I am constantly amazed at the old-world view to application scalability and performance. [...] They seem unaware that scalability has many facets, and some haunt them from the first draft of an architecture all the way through each milestone of coding. And many can be resolved without spending money on hardware or expensive software, or even without derailing the project schedule. Here are some of my scalability tips that should be applied at all times of a project's life.

His suggestions include:

  • Build Your Technical Team From The Top Down
  • Develop With Realistically Sized Data
  • Design For A Single-Slice Cluster
  • Your Transaction Database Is Not Your Reporting Database

and several more - check out the full post for explanations of these and the other great tips.

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Nick Halstead's Blog:
Open source Scaling Ruby on Rails vs PHP
April 20, 2007 @ 07:05:00

On his "What I accidently learnt about programming" blog today, Nick Halstead shares some of his thoughts on Open Source scaling functionality in languages, specifically comparing Ruby and PHP.

Compared to the current problems Rails is facing PHP is proving itself within a very wide range of sectors including the commercial sector. And although PHP in its raw state is slower to develop for and more prone to having BAD code written for it. The guys at Zend (and the open source community) are doing a great job at building a framework that is making developed quicker and enforces better code practices.

He talks about the advantage of using a framework and how, because PHP is such a flexible, open language, it's easy to go "under the hood" and mess with things a bit. This is all in the scope of the issues that Rails is having and how it's a bit more difficult to make things custom to what you need.

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