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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Finding Differences in Images with PHP
May 26, 2016 @ 10:56:33

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new tutorial from author Christopher Pitt on an interesting topic that could come in very handy in the right situations: finding differences in images with PHP.

I recently stumbled across a fascinating question: how could I tell whether an image had changed significantly? As PHP developers, the most troublesome image problem we have to deal with is how to resize an upload with an acceptable loss of quality. In the end I discovered what many before me have – that this problem becomes relatively simple given the application of some fundamental mathematical principles.

He starts off by talking about images as "bitmaps", basically a collection of pixels composed in a grid. He also mentions images as sets of vectors, but in PHP the bitmap approach is simpler and more understandable. He includes some code showing the breakdown of an image into its RBG colors values and what the data represents. He then moves into measuring the distance "in three dimensions" with a bit of geometry and applies them to a simple State class. This class breaks down the image given into RBG details then, eventually, compares the other image based on the euclidean distance between the points on the original and the ones from the new image. He filters some of these results through a standard deviation view to weed out problems with almost identical images.

tagged: image difference evaluation tutorial gd similar euclideandistance standarddeviation

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/finding-differences-in-images-with-php/

Matt Stauffer:
Custom conditionals with Laravel's Blade Directives
Oct 12, 2015 @ 09:57:53

Matt Stauffer has a post to his site showing you how to use custom conditionals with Blade, the templating engine for the popular Laravel framework.

One of the greatest aspects of Laravel Blade is that it's incredibly easy to handle view partials and control logic. I find myself frequently extracting the contents of a loop out to a Blade partial and then passing just a bit of data into the partial.

But sometimes the repetitive code isn't the view itself, but the conditional logic I'm running.

He gives a practical example of an issue he had in some recent work he's done: a simple site for his physical trainer that needed to test for public vs non-public resources. The same evaluation code was being pasted all over the site so he looked for a better way. He introduces the idea of a custom directive in Blade and how they're converted to PHP out in the view. He shows how to make an @public directive to replace his cut-and-paste logic from before and make the template much cleaner. He includes the code for this simple directive and ends the post with some other possible options use could use the directives for.

tagged: conditional laravel directive tutorial blade custom evaluation

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/custom-conditionals-with-laravels-blade-directives

Rob Allen:
ZendInput and empty values
Aug 04, 2015 @ 10:49:15

Rob Allen has a post to his site to help clear up some confusion with how the ZendInput component handles "empty" between the required, allow_empty and continue_if_empty logic.

These settings define what happens when you try to validate an empty value for a given input. For ZendInput, empty means exactly equal to null, an empty string or an empty array.

He starts by outlining each of the three settings including both their default settings and its intent. He gets into a bit more detail on continue_if_empty as it has additional logic that depends on the results of the other two settings. He includes a small test application that cycles through a set of values and evaluates them through a ZendInput instance. The output is also included in the post so you can verify your system is seeing the same evaluation results.

tagged: zendinput empty value evaluation required allowempty continueifempty tutorial

Link: http://akrabat.com/zend-input-empty-values/

Sameer Borate:
Cron Expression Parser in PHP
Jul 21, 2015 @ 10:15:09

If you've ever worked with the "cron" tool on a unix-based system, you know that there's a special syntax that comes along with defining when the commands should run. It can be difficult to get this timing exactly right, especially if you're very picky about the execution time. In this post from Sameer Borate he shows you a PHP library that can help not only parse current cron configurations but also provides shortcuts for common timings (ex: "daily" or "weekly").

Working with cron scheduling can many times be a frustrating affair. Although setting a few cron jobs at one time can be easy, calculating cron dates in the future in code can get time consuming quickly. The PHP cron expression parser described here can parse a CRON expression, determine if it is due to run, calculate the next run date of the expression or calculate the previous run date of the expression. You can calculate dates far into the future or past by skipping n number of matching dates.

He includes some examples of putting the library to use to define a cron object based on an expression (either via a shortcut or an actual cron time expression). You can then check to see if the cron is "due" or perform some various operations about its run dates. This includes a formatted output of the previous run time, the next run time and the calculation of the next/previous run time based on a relative timestamp.

tagged: cron parser library example tutorial run due evaluation datetime

Link: http://www.codediesel.com/php/cron-expression-parser-in-php/

NetTuts.com:
The Ternary Operator in PHP
May 29, 2015 @ 11:41:44

If you're relatively new to the PHP language, there's an interesting "shorthand" method for evaluation that you may not know about. In this new tutorial from NetTuts.com they show you this handy method - the ternary operator.

The ternary operator allows us to simplify some PHP conditional statements. We'll see how it can be used, with test-driven development and refactoring, to simplify code.

While the tutorial is largely a screencast, they do provide a quick summary of what the operator is mainly used for and an example for quick reference.

tagged: ternary operator tutorial screencast introduction evaluation

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/the-ternary-operator-in-php--cms-24010

Nikita Popov:
Order of evaluation in PHP
Sep 25, 2013 @ 10:51:35

If you're the kind of person that wonders more about the internals of PHP and how it works "under the covers" you'll find this new post from Nikita Popov a good read. It talks about how PHP handles its order of operations in more complex evaluation statements.

At this point many people seem to think that the order in which an expression is evaluated is determined by operator precedence and associativity. But that's not true. Precedence and associativity only tell you how the expressions are grouped.[...] What does this tell us about the order of evaluation? Nothing. Operator precedence and associativity specify grouping, but they do not specify in which order the groups are executed.

He gives a few examples to illustrate his point including multiple increments of the same variable at one time and how it's the "fault" of the compiled variables that were introduced in PHP 5.1. He shows the opcode version of the same PHP userland code and talks briefly about how to avoid this odd functionality in your application.

tagged: order evaluation opcode compiled variable

Link: https://gist.github.com/nikic/6699370

Michael Nitschinger:
A Journey on Avoiding Nulls in PHP
Feb 20, 2013 @ 12:17:39

Michael Nitschinger has written up a post looking at avoiding nulls in your applications in favor of a better kind of value handling - the introduction of "Optional" handling.

While every developer has kind of accepted their existence, they are suddenly there when we'd desperately need them to not show up. How often did you writeif($obj === null) in your PHP code? Can't there be a better, more elegant and fault-tolerant solution to the problem?

His solution is to create a PHP version of this "Optional" functionality (via an abstract class) that allows some evaluation of the returned value from method calls on the object. Methods like "isPresent", "getOrElse", "of" and "fromNullable" make it easier to work with null values instead of just the triple-equals checking. He includes not only the code for the classes you'll need to implement it but examples of it in use - an "Optional" abstract class and two child classes, "Present" and "Absent".

tagged: avoid null return value optional absent present evaluation tutorial

Link:

Jani Hartikainen:
Parsing and evaluating PHP in Haskell: Part 1
Jan 17, 2013 @ 11:13:23

Jani Hartikainen has posted the first part of a series of articles sharing his experiences with an experiment he's conducting - trying to parse and evaluate PHP in Haskell.

The other day I uploaded a new experimental project on GitHub – A Haskell PHP parser / evaluator. It doesn’t understand 100% of all PHP syntax, but it was an interesting experiment nevertheless. Here’s some insights and other thoughts from working on the code.

He gets the "why?" question out of the way early, noting that it was mainly a desire to play with Haskell and figured parsing something he already knew well was a good first project. He also mentions the "Parsec" library that seems well suited for the parsing part of the process. There were some issues that he came across, however including dealing with PHP's weak typing and handling all of the possible incarnations of PHP script structure. He includes an example AST showing his different data structures (PHPValue, PHPExpr and PHPStmt). The next part of the series will be more about the evaluation of this structure.

tagged: parsing evaluation source haskell project experiment

Link:

Programmers.StackExchange.com:
How can I test PHP skills in a interview?
Aug 16, 2012 @ 11:35:38

In this recent post to the "Programmers" area of the StackExchange site, the user asks the community for help in testing a PHP developer during the interview process to asses their level of knowledge accurately.

My company needs to hire a PHP developer, but nobody has PHP knowledge in my company and we find difficult to test for PHP skills. If it were a C/Java developer I would ask him to write a quick implementation of the Game of Life, but PHP is a completely different language. I saw this test with interest. Anyone else has more suggestions?

There's several other suggestions made touching on a wide range of evaluations including:

  • Security concerns (like SQL injection)
  • Debugging/Profiling
  • Framework experience
  • Good overall development skills
  • And inks to other similar questions
tagged: test interview skills developer development evaluation

Link:

Fortrabbit.com:
Cloudscapes - Comparing PHP Cloud Hosting Platforms
Jul 11, 2012 @ 11:27:07

On the Fortrabbit.com blog there's a new post that does a quick overview and comparison of 11 of the more popular cloud-based hosting platforms out there that are PHP friendly.

We are currently building yet another PHP Cloud Platform ourselves. Of course we looked around to see what the others are up to. This is my (Franks) personal point of view of the current market situation showcasing my favorite services. I try not to judge, neither i will compare features nor prices.

Services on his list include:

tagged: cloudscapes cloud hosting provider evaluation

Link: