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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Using PHP Streams Effectively
November 21, 2013 @ 11:54:02

Vito Tardia has a new tutorial posted to the SitePoint PHP blog today showing you how to use PHP streams effectively, a continuation of his streams series started here.

n my previous article we've discovered the basics of PHP Streams and how powerful they were. In this tutorial we are going to use this power in the real world. First I'll show you how to build your custom filters and attach them to a stream, then we'll package our filters inside a document parser application.

He starts out by introducing the concept of filters in streams - bits of code that can be attached to the stream to perform operations on the data traveling through it. He includes a simple base64 encoding example with a fopen call to illustrate. He gets into more complex filtering by creating a Markdown filter capable of translating the incoming Markdown-formatted data into a document using the MarkdownExtra library. He also includes an example of another filter added on post-Markdown conversion, a Template filter using the RainTPL templating library.

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using streams filter markdown template tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/using-php-streams-effectively/

Hannes Magnusson:
PHP Stream Notifications <3 MongoDB
September 17, 2013 @ 09:02:54

In this latest post to his site, Hannes Magnusson looks briefly at an interesting use for PHP's streams functionality - reading data from a MongoDB connection as a streaming resource.

PHP Streams have several pretty nifty features that most people don't really know about; Filters, Wrappers, Context, and Notifications. Documenting these is a bit difficult, and getting the user to discover these features is even more problematic, as these things usually live outside of the normal path (function reference). Maybe I'll blog about these things in the future, but for now I want to talk about the Stream (context) Notifications - or more specifically; Stream Notifications in the MongoDB extension for PHP.

He talks some about what stream notifications are on a basic level and some general use cases for them. From there he moves into the MongoDB world and some changes in the mongodb 1.4 extension over to using streams. He also talks about some of the things coming in the 1.5 version including progress reporting for read/write actions.

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mongodb streams extension nosql notification

Link: http://bjori.blogspot.com/2013/09/php-stream-notifications-mongodb.html

PHPMaster.com:
Understanding Streams in PHP
June 26, 2013 @ 10:43:45

PHPMaster.com has a new tutorial for those interested in how to work with streams, he base resources behind working with things like files and remote connections.

Streams are resources provided by PHP that we often use transparently, but which can also be very powerful tools. By learning how to harness their power, we can take our applications to a higher level. [...] Every stream has a implementation wrapper which has the additional code necessary to handle the specific protocol or encoding. PHP provides some built-in wrappers and we can easily create and register custom ones. We can even modify or enhance the behavior of wrappers using contexts and filters.

They start by introducing two of the most commonly used streams - "file" and "http" as well as some of the wrappers that can be used to work with them. He also talks about the "php://" stream, a special instance that lets you access things like a temporary memory block and stdout/stdin. He finishes up the tutorial with a look at "contexts" - the parameters that can be used to modify the stream wrapper (like his HTTP example).

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tutorial streams introduction file http internal

Link: http://phpmaster.com/%EF%BB%BFunderstanding-streams-in-php

Wojciech Sznapka's Blog:
Power of PHP streams - decompress gz archives on the fly from remote server
November 24, 2010 @ 08:39:05

Wojciech Sznapka has a new post to his blog today looking at the "power of PHP streams" and how they can be used to decompress gzipped data from remote servers.

Probably most of us heard about streams in PHP. They are background of all files and network operations in PHP, even if we don't see it. Everytime when you use file_get_contents or fopen you are actually using streams. But there are many stream wrappers I haven't used, because they aren't well known.One of them is compress.zlib (and two other compression stream filters).

He includes a quick example (because, thankfully, that's all working with streams like this usually requires) about pulling in a file from his server and uses the stream to fetch and unzip the data to display the contents.

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streams tutorial gzip decompress archive


Kevin Schroeder's Blog:
You want to do WHAT with PHP? Chapter 4
September 02, 2010 @ 13:49:23

Kevin Schroeder has another new post to his blog today with an excerpt from his "You Want to Do WHAT with PHP?" book. This new post is a section from the fourth chapter looking at stream handling.

Communication is key to building applications now and for the future. While it is not something that I think that everyone should do, I have not seem many applications that make good use of streams in PHP. Streams can be immensely useful in the right situations, but a lot of developers are not really aware of how streams can be used. [...] While I don't think you will end up basing your application around streams it is a really good idea to know how streams work.

The sample code (and description) talk about changing the properties of a stream on the fly. He shows how, with a fgets loop checking the input, he can catch a command from the already running script and change the compression setting on the currently open stream. The compression changes the stream's data from plain text to a binary format as handled by the streams functionality.

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book excerpt kevinschroeder streams


Davey Shafik's Blog:
Avoiding EVAL()
February 02, 2009 @ 11:15:24

Davey Shafik has a helpful hint for avoiding one of the worst functions to use in PHP - eval.

There are a shed-load of ways to "eval()" code without actually calling the eval() function '" usually done simply to avoid the use of the dreaded "evil()" function, but often times because the system has eval() disabled using "disable_functions" in php.ini. Here is another simple way to avoid eval() without writing out files to the filesystem

His example uses the streams wrapper to natively execute the code from a string variable as a data element, base64 decoded. It's more of a proof-of-concept than anything else, but its an interesting solution to a tough problem to solve at times.

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eval evil avoid streams wrapper data base64 execute


Matthew Turland's Blog:
Benchmarking PHP HTTP Clients
November 24, 2008 @ 07:56:30

Matthew Turland has this new blog post looking at some benchmarks he's generated for a group of mainstream PHP HTTP clients:

One of the interesting bits of research that I've done is benchmarking various mainstream PHP HTTP clients. Of course, we all know that there are lies, damned lies, statistics, and benchmarks, so take these with a grain of salt.

He ran them on his Sony Viao on Ubuntu with a stock PHP5 package. The tested packages were the pecl_http extension, the streams http wrapper, curl integration into PHP 5, PEAR::HTTP Client class and the Zend_Http_Client component. He includes the code he used for both a basic request and for something slightly more complex (posting form data). He used the XDebug and KCachegrind combination to produce the results.

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benchmark http client pecl pear zendframework streams curl


Davey Shafik's Blog:
PHP Streams Book (Coming soon!)
April 25, 2008 @ 12:04:09

We can expect big things from Davey Shafik in the coming months - he's been working on a book for php|architect about one of the more powerful bits of functionality in PHP - streams.

For about 6 months now, I've been itching to write a book on the PHP Streams Layer - one of my favorite features of PHP; and also one of the least known considering it's powerful abilities.

He describes his goal simply as this: to create the definitive resource for working with the streams later in PHP. It should be out sometime in the third quarter of 2008, so keep your eye out for it then.

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streams layer book phparchitect publish definitive guide


Matthew Turland's Blog:
Interesting Bug in the HTTP Streams Wrapper
April 14, 2008 @ 08:49:04

Matthew Turland has come across an "interesting bug" in PHP's stream wrappers functionality - some strange 404 or 500 HTTP errors in one of his scripts.

I wrote a small script a while back that's gained a surprising amount of popularity thanks to a plug from the site that it posts to. [...] I learned that this [connection from the script] could be done with streams, I attempted to implement it in that fashion, but ran into strange issues where I would get 404 or 500-level HTTP errors rather than the response I was expected.

He eventually found the bug related to his problem (in the 5.2.x branch) but happily notes that it has been corrected and will be patched in the upcoming 5.3 (and 6) branches.

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bug streams wrapper issue 404 500 connection header contenttype


PHPClasses.org:
A PHP killer feature - Streams abstraction
February 01, 2008 @ 15:36:24

On the PHPClasses.org website there's a new entry covering, among other things, one handy feature PHP includes to let developers read and write their data more flexibly - streams.

This article explains what are stream handlers and how they simplify PHP developers lives by allowing PHP applications to easily read and write data from containers, like remote Web pages or e-mail messages, as if they were files. [...] The article also presents more examples of cool stream handlers classes submitted to the PHPClasses site by several authors.

He describes the abstraction that the streams interface allows, how they can make your life easier, a real-life example of streams in action (working with POP3) and some of the classes that have been contributed to PHPClasses.org that use them.

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streams abstraction class example pop3 handler streams abstraction class example pop3 handler



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