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Derick Rethans:
New MongoDB Drivers for PHP and HHVM: Architecture
Jan 12, 2016 @ 09:37:59

Derick Rethans continues his look at the latest version of the MongoDB drivers for both PHP and HHVM with this look at their architecture and how it's different from previous versions.

We recently released a new version of the MongoDB driver for PHP (the mongodb extension). This release is the result of nearly a year and a half of work to re-engineer and rewrite the original MongoDB driver (mongo). In the previous blog post, I covered the back story of the how and why we undertook this effort. In this new blog post, I will talk about the architecture of the new driver.

He uses the goals stated at the end of his previous post and covers:

  • Support for Other PHP Engines like HHVM
  • [How/Why] The Driver Should Be Bare Bones
  • No Reinvention of the Wheel
  • Provide an Easy to Use API
  • Backwards Compatibility

From there he then gives an overview (complete with a handy graphic) of the overall MongoDB PHP ecosystem and where the extensions fit in the plan.

tagged: mongodb derickrethans drivers hhvm architecture series part2

Link: http://derickrethans.nl/new-drivers-part2.html

Derick Rethans:
New MongoDB Drivers for PHP and HHVM: History
Dec 02, 2015 @ 10:53:33

In this post to his site Derick Rethans talks about some major updates that have been made to the MongoDB drivers for both PHP and HHVM users.

We recently released a new version of the MongoDB driver for PHP. This release is the result of nearly a year and a half work to re-engineer and rewrite the MongoDB driver. In this blog post, I will cover the back story of the how and why we undertook this effort.

He starts back with the original driver (in 2009), the features it offered and how it was structured. He talks about the evolution of the functionality to more of a C PHP extension and when it reached the v1.0.0 milestone. From there he talks about updates made to the JSON handling, features added in 1.3 and some of the larger design issues they ran up against making future development much more difficult. He ends the post with an overview of their goals for this new driver version and a promise for a following post with more details on this structure.

tagged: mongodb driver version hhvm history overview extension

Link: http://derickrethans.nl/new-drivers.html

Hannes Magnusson:
Next Generation MongoDB Driver for PHP!
Apr 15, 2015 @ 11:41:50

Hannes Magnusson has a new post to his site talking about the new update to the MongoDB driver for PHP and its focus on simplicity.

For the past few months I've been working on a "next-gen" MongoDB driver for PHP -- codename "phongo". The aim was to build a new PHP extension ontop of the mongoc and libbson libraries to reduce maintenance of the extension itself and focus more on providing the ecosystem with improved support and libraries.

The new driver is available on PECL (called "mongodb", surprisingly enough). It doesn't include any of the bells and whistles found in the previous "mongo" driver. It doesn't include any `group` or `count` command helpers, and you won't find any Collection or Database objects; however, it really doesn't need any of these things.

He talks about the three basic things it can do: execute a command, a write or a query to locate records. He also answers the question many developers have about this shift to simplicity and provides a link to a PHP library to make porting over existing MongoDB handling simpler.

tagged: mongodb driver pecl extension language simplicity version release

Link: http://bjori.blogspot.com/2015/04/next-gen-mongodb-driver.html

MongoDB Blog:
Call for Feedback: The New PHP and HHVM Drivers
Mar 12, 2015 @ 11:33:23

The MongoDB blog has a new post asking for feedback on what the user community thinks of their approach to supporting MongoDB functionality in PHP 5.x, HHVM and even out to PHP7.

Since the PHP driver first appeared on the scene, MongoDB has gone through many changes. [...] Beyond MongoDB's features, our ecosystem has also changed. [...] During the spring of 2014, we worked with a team of students from Facebook's Open Academy program to prototype an HHVM driver modeled after the 1.x API.

[...] Although the final result was not feature complete, the project was a valuable learning experience. The C driver proved quite up to the task, and HNI, which allows an HHVM extension to be written with a combination of PHP and C++, highlighted critical areas of the driver for which we'd want to use C. This all leads up to the question of how best to support PHP 5.x, HHVM, and PHP 7.0 with our next-generation driver.

They've shared the overview of the new driver structure including three layers: the system level functionality, the extensions themselves and a MongoDB userland library. They walk through the thinking on each of the pieces of the puzzle and how they all couple together to make for a more robust, flexible system that's also easy to use.

tagged: mongodb drivers extension mongo userland library architecture opinion feedback

Link: http://www.mongodb.com/blog/post/call-feedback-new-php-and-hhvm-drivers

Derick Rethans:
Questions from the Field: Should I Escape My Input, And If So, How?
Jan 27, 2015 @ 09:22:04

In his latest post Derick Rethans shares his answer to a question he was asked at a recent PHP conference regarding the escaping of input before use in a MongoDB query.

At last weekend's PHP Benelux I gave a tutorial titled "From SQL to NoSQL". Large parts of the tutorial covered using MongoDB—how to use it from PHP, schema design, etc. I ran a little short of time, and since then I've been getting some questions. One of them being: "Should I escape my input, and if so, how?". Instead of trying to cram my answer in 140 characters on Twitter, I thought it'd be wise to reply with this blog post. The short answer is: yes, you do need to escape.

He uses the rest of the post to get into the longer answer, a bit more detail about why you should escape and what kinds of things can be done. He points out that, because of how MongoDB queries are created, SQL injection is much more difficult. He does remind you that superglobals can also be used to send arrays too which could lead to unexpected data input. He gives an example of how this would work and why it would be a problem.

So although MongoDB's query language does not require you to build strings, and hence "escape" input, it is required that you either make sure that the data is of the correct data type.
tagged: escape input mongodb phpbnl15 question answer datatype

Link: http://derickrethans.nl/escape-input.html

Lorna Mitchell:
XHGui on VM, Storage on Host
Jan 05, 2015 @ 12:09:08

Lorna Mitchell has a new post today showing you how you can use XHGui in a virtual machine, sorting the resulting performance data on the VM rather than your local machine.

I'm doing some performance tuning on a project at the moment and my favourite tool is still XHGui - but it's designed to run on the same machine as its victim and since this is a vagrant VM, the chances of me destroying the machine and therefore the data are pretty high! Instead, I set it up to store the data onto the host and I thought I'd share how I did that. All these instructions for Ubuntu on both host and guest, and I've tried not to be specific about the vagrant elements in order to focus on how the pieces fit together rather than what you should type.

She walks you through all the steps you'll need to get the software up and running as well as configuring the actual guest VM to direct the data to the right place. She sets up the data source to push the results into (a MongoDB) and configures the PHP installation with an "auto prepend" of the XHGui header file. Finally, she includes the commands you'll need to view the data on the VM itself, running the built-in PHP web server as an ad-hoc instance on the VM itself.

tagged: xhgui xhprof mongodb vm virtualmachine tutorial localhost

Link: http://www.lornajane.net/posts/2015/xhgui-on-vm-storage-on-host

Derick Rethans:
Parallelizing document retrieval
Dec 09, 2014 @ 11:59:20

In his latest post Derick Rethans shows how to parallelize document retrieval from a MongoDB database via PHP. This makes it possible to speed up the read operation caused by reading each item one at a time.

MongoDB 2.6 has a new feature that allows you to read all the documents from one collection with multiple cursors in parallel. This is done through a database command called parallelCollectionScan. The idea behind it is that it is faster then reading all the documents in a collection sequentially.

He includes an example snippet that enables the "parallelCollectionScan" handling for a "cities" collection and the resulting output. He shows how to manually create MongoCommandCursors (or let the driver do it for you) and use PHP's own MultipleIterator to process all of the cursors at essentially the same time.

tagged: mongodb driver parallel document retrieval cursor iterator

Link: http://derickrethans.nl/parallelcollectionscan.html

DZone.com:
MongoDB Driver Tips & Tricks: PHP
Jun 04, 2014 @ 10:10:49

On DZone.com there's a new post from Chris Chang that's the third part of the series looking at using various language drivers for working with MongoDB. In this latest article he focuses in on the PHP driver, giving a brief introduction and a few handy tips.

This blog post is the third of a series where we are covering each of the major MongoDB drivers in depth. The driver we’ll be covering here is the PHP driver, developed and maintained by the MongoDB, Inc. team (primarily @derickr, @bjori and @jmikola).

He includes a link to some basic examples and shares a "production-ready connect string" with some MongoLab recommended settings. The tips include topics ranging from working with index builds, the lowering of is_master_interval and configuring the connectionTimeoutMS setting for optimum connection handling.

tagged: mongodb driver tips tricks mongolab index master interval connection timeout

Link: http://java.dzone.com/articles/mongodb-driver-tips-tricks-php

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building a Simple Blog App with MongoDB and PHP
Mar 14, 2014 @ 09:19:36

On PHPMaster.com there's a recent tutorial posted showing you the creation of a simple blog application with MongoDB + PHP. It's a basic overview, so it's mostly about creates and reads, but it does help get things working.

If you want to create a blog using MongoDB and PHP, this article will teach you. [...] The reason I chose to build a blog application is because it is a basic CRUD application and it is very suitable for easing into PHP and MongoDB web development. We will build a plain user interface using Bootstrap with simple textboxes and buttons. A MongoDB database will store all the content.

He starts off by introducing MongoDB and some of the basic concepts around databases, collections and documents as they relate to it. He then moves into the installation process, getting and configuring a simple MongoDB instance running on localhost. He helps you get the MongoDB PECL driver installed for PHP and includes a bit of code to test the connection. Finally, he gets into the blog example itself and includes the full code to get it up and running.

tagged: tutorial blog application sample introduction mongodb database

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-simple-blog-app-mongodb-php/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Social Network Style Posting with PHP, MongoDB and jQuery - part 2
Nov 19, 2013 @ 13:55:17

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their series about the creation of a simple comment posting social site based on PHP, MongoDB and jQuery. In this second part they build on the structure from part one and add in posting and "liking".

In the previous part of the series, we explained the database architecture, post stream design and application flow required for developing our post mechanism wherein the user will be able to post a status, like/unlike other people's statuses and comment on them. This part of the series will drive you through the coding required to implement these functionalities. We will use the application flow and database structure as discussed in the last article. Don't forget to download the code from the github repo if you'd like to follow along.

First he shows you how to get new posts added to the database, POSTed to the backend PHP script. He also shows how to insert the contents back into the page and pull out the latest posts. Next up is the like/unlike-ing of the posts, handled by a simple submission to another backend script.

tagged: tutorial mongodb social post jquery

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/social-network-style-posting-php-mongodb-jquery-part-2/