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SitePoint PHP Blog:
What to Expect from Yii 2.0
September 22, 2014 @ 12:32:17

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post today from Arno Slatius that talks about some of the features coming in Yii 2.0, a PHP-based MVC framework with a target for a stable release coming very soon.

Yii 2.0 was released into beta last April and the goal for a first stable release was set for the middle of 2014. The GitHub issue list has 300 open issues and 2913 closed while I'm writing this and both numbers are still increasing. The progress to the 2.0RC milestone was at 99%. My guess is that the team is close, but we'll probably have to wait just a little bit longer. While we're all waiting, lets take a look at what we can expect by looking at an already available example.

He starts with a "tiny bit of history" about the framework (its origins, the work done on 2.0) and talks about some of the requirements to get it installed and working. He helps you set up a sample project and shows off the Twitter Bootstrap integration, the debug bar and the "Gii" tool that can help generate code automatically (following the conventions of the framework). He finishes off the post with a look at some of the main things that changed in the 2.0 release including moving some method calls to properties, datetime handling, behavior definitions and model/view updates.

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yii v2 introduction tutorial changes requirement install gii history

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/expect-yii-2-0/

Halls of Valhalla:
From PHP 5 to 7
September 22, 2014 @ 10:56:32

On the "Halls of Valhalla" site there's a new post the tries to explain the jump from PHP5 to PHP7 and what all that means for the language (and community around it).

Since around 2005 we've heard talk about PHP 6 development. There have even been books sold about it. But where is it? As of July of this year it was decided that there won't be one and that PHP will skip directly to version 7. Why is it skipping to the next major version, and what ever happened with PHP 6? And if we're already jumping to PHP 7, what kinds of features will it have?

They start with a "brief history" of PHP since its inception back in the mid 1990s and follow its evolution at a high level through the years. Then comes the topic of PHP6 and the work that was already being put towards it and integrated Unicode support. It talks about some of the difficulties of this conversion and the delays that ended up happening. Instead, it was decided that things would stay in the PHP 5.x series and 5.3, 5.4 and 5.5 have been created since. The jump to PHP7 came from this vote with several different reasons influencing the decision.

The post finishes with a look at some of the new things that will be coming in PHP7 including major performance improvements, abstract syntax tree functionality and asynchronous programming, allowing for the execution of parallel tasks in the same request.

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php5 php6 php7 community unicode language history features

Link: http://halls-of-valhalla.org/beta/news/from-php-5-to-7,146/

Three Devs & A Maybe Podcast:
The First All-Episode Quiz
August 14, 2014 @ 09:17:35

On the latest episode of the Three Devs & A Maybe podcast Michael Budd, Fraser Hart, Lewis Cains and Edd Mann have their first quiz show (Episode #38).

This week we start our chat off with the myth of just simply 'reskinning' a website, along with the dreaded !important in CSS. Following this, as we love quizzes so much, we decided to dedicate a full show to one. In this weeks quiz we touch upon many areas of PHP, JavaScript, CSS and random computer/programming history. We also now have t-shirts on sale, available via the first link in the show-notes (why don't you treat yourself).

Topics discussed in this episode include AngularJS fundamentals, speed in software development and avoiding burnout. You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the show also consider subscribing to their feed.

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threedevsandamaybe podcast ep38 quiz episode reskin css history

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/posts/the-first-all-episode-quiz/

Grant Lovell:
Why PHP doesn't suck anymore
June 17, 2014 @ 09:04:07

In a recent post Grant Lovell shares some of the reasons why he thinks PHP doesn't suck anymore based on his presentation from the Waterloo-Wellinton Webmakers.

Chances are if you have been in web development for any amount of time you have done some work with PHP and maybe it was a great experience like it was for me, or perhaps it was hours and hours of digging through WordPress code to figure out why a plugin wasn't working. [...] A friend from U of W was giving me a hand setting up the catalog and introduced me to PHP. He was able to build the whole catalog, at least a basic first version, in one afternoon. You can imagine I was pretty excited about something that I thought was going to be weeks of cutting and pasting being done in a few short lines of PHP code. From then I was hooked.

He looks at a brief history of PHP, from its beginnings as a set of simple scripts by Rasmus Lerdorf out to the current push and support of the language by big companies like Facebook. Despite all of this, he points out that PHP "went wrong" somewhere along the way thanks to things like bad tutorials and practices. He talks about the GoPHP5 initiative and some of the signs of improvement in PHP: frameworks, Composer, the FIG and the "PHP renaissance." He looks into the future and sees only improvement thanks to better tutorial content (on various sites) and the increased amount of cooperation between developers wanting to make the language better.

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opinion suck language history improvement future

Link: http://transmission.vehikl.com/why-php-doesnt-suck-anymore/

Phil Sturgeon:
Heroku and PHP Sitting in a Tree. K.I.S.S.I.N.G
May 12, 2014 @ 09:40:49

In a recent post Phil Sturgeon talks about the recent news from Heroku about their integrated PHP support and some of his own experience in using the new service feature and migrate his blog over.

Heroku was - as far as I remember - the first (mainstream) PaaS on the market. It was Ruby-only but it was that symbol of modern web development at the time, with the whole "slinging code", "getting shit done", make a Git repo and start shipping bro, hack project/agile-til-it-works mindset. [...] Git push your code, its deployed, one-click installs and drag to scale. It sucked that it was always for Ruby, because as I was also doing a lot of work in PHP I obviously wished I could have the same for my other projects.

He walks through some of the "evolution" of the PaaS (platform as a service) market as it related to PHP environments. He talks about other services like PHPFog, Pagodabox and Fortrabbit. The Heroku added true PHP support and he made his move. He goes through the steps he followed to get his blog migrated over and the commands needed to make the push.

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heroku paas platform service history support pyrocms

Link: http://philsturgeon.co.uk/blog/2014/05/heroku-and-php-sitting-in-a-tree

HipHop Blog:
Faster and Cheaper The Evolution of the hhvm JIT
December 12, 2013 @ 12:09:35

On the HHVM (HipHop Virtal Machine) blog there's a new post that looks at the evolution of the HHVM JIT compiler since the project started about four years ago.

When the hhvm project was started almost 4 years ago, it had a two-part mandate: First, create a PHP JIT that could serve facebook.com at least as efficiently as hphpc, the PHP execution engine we were using at the time. Second, replace hphpi, the interpreter our PHP developers were using in their daily work. hphpc and hphpi were independent pieces of software with unintentional subtle differences in behavior and a significant maintenance burden. Unifying the execution engines used in production and development would make our jobs easier while giving the PHP devs a nicer experience at the same time.

The article goes on to talk about their needs from the environment and the basics of how the JIT compiler works to "translate" the code into something more low level than even C++. They chart out the performance of the HHVM versus the HPPC, showing a major growth around the end of the last year and continuing into this year. They also give an example of how this translation happens from a PHP script to bytecode to the translated result from their "TranslatorX64" tool.

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hhvm jit compiler justintime history hphpc facebook

Link: http://www.hhvm.com/blog/2027/faster-and-cheaper-the-evolution-of-the-hhvm-jit

PHP Manual Masterpieces:
PHP 2.0 A Review in Retrospect
November 01, 2013 @ 10:33:19

The "PHP Manual Masterpieces" site has varied a bit from its usual format and has gone with its own "blast from the past" doing a review in retrospect of PHP 2.0, a long forgotten version of the language with some "interesting" features.

This is not about PHP as we now know it in the waning months of 2013. This is about the waning months of the year 1997. I was nine years old. My life was not yet overshadowed by haphazard scripting languages. Somewhere in the wilderness, during a savage thunderstorm in the dead of night, a Danish Canadian pushed the 2.0 revision of his personal home page generator's tarball to a web server.

The post looks at some of the "horrors" that made up PHP at that time including:

  • The footer PHP/FI added to every page
  • No real concept of input/output filtering
  • The use of register_globals
  • Weird handling of superglobal values
  • The inclusion of magic_quotes

And, of course, all of these (and more) complete with quotes from the manual at the time talking about reasons behind their use and code where appropriate.

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php2 review manual version phpfi history language

Link: http://phpmanualmasterpieces.tumblr.com/post/65544023819/php-2-0-a-review-in-retrospect

The Nerdery:
Why Most Stories About WordPress Security Are Wrong
September 12, 2013 @ 09:18:55

On The Nerdery's blog today there's a new post suggesting that most of the reports of WordPress' insecurity are wrong and they're going to set the record straight.

I have often heard the remark "WordPress is insecure!" My response is "Where did you hear that?" and "When did you hear that?" [...] WordPress core is, in fact, very secure, just as secure as any other Content Management System, just as secure as any other software suite or Operating System. Security issues most often arise from administrators and users. In other words, you are the weakest link.

They suggest that between the high-profile nature of WordPress and the constant (sometimes wrongful) warning being put out there about its security, people perpetuate the message sometimes unknowingly. Besides the human element being the largest risk, they also point out a few others including issues around shared hosting and the availability of easy-to-find tools to exploit flaws. They talk about a brief history of the WP core security and how they define the real security of a product - how quickly it responds to security issues. They also include a few suggestions for you to help harden your own WP installation.

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wordpress security risk history wrong story advice

Link: http://blog.nerdery.com/2013/09/why-wordpress-security-stories-are-wrong/

Inviqa techPortal:
Rasmus Lerdorf at PHP London
August 02, 2013 @ 10:52:31

On the Inviqa techPortal today there's a new post talking about the most recent speaker at the PHP LondonRasmus Lerdorf.

July's PHP London had a particularly notable speaker - Rasmus Lerdorf himself presenting what's new in PHP. So many people wanted to attend that, with limited venue capacity, a live (and recorded) video stream was used for the first time. You can skip straight to seeing the slides and video of the session if you like, or keep reading for my impressions of the evening.

They include a brief overview of what Rasmus talked about including: a brief history and evolution of the language, a few points about PHP 5.4 and then on to the "shiny and new" of PHP 5.5. and the features it introduced. He also added in a bit at the end about two tools that his employer, Etsy, has released to help with more atomic deployments.

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rasmuslerdorf phplondon usergroup history evolution features atomic deployment

Link: http://techportal.inviqa.com/2013/08/02/rasmus-lerdorf-at-php-london

Dougal Campbell:
WordPress 10th Anniversary Blogging Project
May 02, 2013 @ 10:22:48

Dougal Campbell has a new post to his site with his own contribution to the "WordPress 10th Anniversary Blogging Project" - a remembrance of his history with the tool and where/when he first started using it.

The official 10th anniversary of the release of WordPress is May 27, 2013. It has been an amazing 10 years, during which WordPress evolved from a simple blogware to a very full-featured CMS (Content Management System), used to power some of the biggest and most popular web sites on the internet. All over the world, people are planning celebrations. As much as I like a good party, I thought this would also be a good time to celebrate WordPress by actually using WordPress - for blogging.

He talks some about when he got started with WordPress (2003) and what's happened since. He suggests that others follow suit and use the "#wp10" hashtag on Twitter to share their own posts.

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wordpress tenth anniversary blog project history

Link: http://dougal.gunters.org/blog/2013/05/01/wordpress-10th-anniversary-blogging-project


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