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Matthieu Napoli:
Approaching coding style rationally
Nov 13, 2015 @ 11:51:07

In a post to his site Matthieu Napoli shares some of his thoughts about "code style rationality" including code formatting in general and some suggestions on one of the harder things in development - naming things.

Habits are sometimes making us blind. We think X looks prettier than Y but that’s just the habit speaking. In this article I’ll try to take a rational approach at coding style. That means leaving the “it looks ugly/better” at the door.

If at any point you feel like something “just doesn’t look good”, breath in, breath out, and try it! Nothing beats hands-on experience, not even some random article on the internet.

He looks at a few subjects specifically (there's way too many to cover them all in detail):

  • the use of trailing commas
  • alignment of values in docblock comments
  • keeping docblock comments minimal
  • using the "Interface" suffix
  • using the "Exception" suffix

He ends the post by reminding readers that the point is to think about code style logically and that no rules are written in stone.

tagged: code style formatting rational approach opinion comma docblock interface exception

Link: http://mnapoli.fr/approaching-coding-style-rationally/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How Laravel Facades Work and How to Use Them Elsewhere
Nov 05, 2015 @ 11:55:49

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted showing you how Laravel Facades work and how they ("Facades") can be used in other framework types.

The Facade pattern is a software design pattern which is often used in object oriented programming. A facade is, in fact, a class wrapping a complex library to provide a simpler and more readable interface to it. The Facade pattern can also be used to provide a unified and well-designed API to a group of complex and poorly designed APIs. The Laravel framework has a feature similar to this pattern, also termed Facades. In this tutorial we will learn how to bring Laravel’s "Facades" to other frameworks.

He starts off by looking at how the Laravel framework has implemented facades through out the entire framework. He includes examples of using these facades (like the App to make a new object instance) and how the base Facade class is structured to make it work. He covers some of the basic features of the classes that extend this base and how they're aliased in the Laravel code/configuration. He then gets into using this same sort of "facade" approach to other frameworks, specifically in an app based on the Silex microframework. He lists some of the requirements and shows how to pull in the base Facade class to extend. He also integrates the aliasing code and configuration to make it simpler to use the short names rather than full namespaced versions of the classes.

tagged: laravel facade introduction tutorial silex approach naming

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/how-laravel-facades-work-and-how-to-use-them-elsewhere/

Davey Shafik's Blog:
Detailed IDE Reviews: How do you want to do this?
Mar 17, 2009 @ 13:45:14

As a follow-up to the IDE comparisons he's done Davey Shafik has asked the interested for a little feedback on how they think he should move forward with the more detailed reviews of each tool.

So, dear readers, I’m doing the IDE reviews for all of you guys and there’s two ways I can proceed: I can take each of the requirements and do a single post per requirement with a writeup about it in detail for each of the 4 IDEs — then I was thinking for each new IDE I try, I can hit those same points. Or I can write up specifically on a single editor at a time, covering all of the requirements and I will also then review anything else about the editor etc.

He's thinking of doing a comparison of the Eclipse-based IDEs in their own right, but wants to get feedback on what would be the most useful for other developers to learn from. Several comments have already been made suggesting approaches to the topic, other editors that might be missing from the list and some support for the Eclipse comparison idea.

tagged: ide detail review eclipse approach suggestion


PHP Form Validation System: An Object-Oriented Approach
Apr 21, 2008 @ 08:49:24

Mike Weiner has put together an article for PHPBuilder.com that's posted today showing a bit more object-oriented solution to validating the user submitted data in your forms:

Whether it is for database submission, emailing, or for some other purpose, forms represent the primary means of enabling a user to send data to an application. As a result, it is important to have control over the data collected by your forms, which will aid in the creation of streamlined, error-free applications.

He lays out the validation method in a graphic going with a generic validation class that then calls the various validation methods (like phone or email) as needed. The "validation set" manages which validations are to be run on which form elements. Example code for each of the bits making up the structure and the implementation are provided.

tagged: object oriented approach form validation tutorial


Zend Developer Zone:
The HYSOCAMTT templating approach
Feb 27, 2008 @ 07:56:00

In a new post to the Zend Developer Zone, Brett Zamir has posted a new tutorial that talks about using the Smarty templating system to create what he calls the HYSOCAMTT templating approach ("Have-Your-Separation-Of-Concerns-And-Mix-Them-Too".

This article aims to highlight a approach which allows one to separate everything from one's business logic to one's design logic, to XHTML from CSS, one's Javascript from the page structure, etc., while at the same time being able to be lazy and include, for example, CSS information within the same document (template) as one's XHTML

The tutorial uses an extension for Smarty called SmartyDocB that makes the documentation side much easier. He works through the templating process and includes some of the code for the .tpl files to get you started.

He also includes some future goals for his idea, a mention of XSL templating, XQuery and the potential for templating across programming languages to make your site even more flexible.

tagged: hysocmatt template approach tutorial smarty smartydocb seperation concerns