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Paul Jones:
Quicker, Easier, More Seductive Names, Usage, and Intent
December 18, 2013 @ 10:39:05

Paul Jones has updated his "service locators vs dependency injection containers" series with another post to his site today, this time he focuses on implementation not names. He suggests that the difference in naming makes it easy to think they're very different things, so he focuses on implementation rather than just the names.

As the disucussion progressed, it became more clear to me that there really is no significant difference in how Dependency Injection containers and Service Locator containers are written. They are both Inversion of Control (IOC) containers, and are not distinguishable by their code, API, features, etc. (although some may have more or fewer features than others).

As such, the terms Dependency Injection and Service Locator appear to be interchangeable in the sense that a container is a container is a container. The difference in naming comes from how the container is used, not how the container is implemented.

He suggests that one of the main differences is where they are, either inside or outside of a non-Factory object. He circles back around to the names, though, and points out that when developers talk to one another, they need to be speaking the same language. As such, he tries to set this vocabulary for the implementations, separati

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dependency injection service locator implementation naming

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/5853

Mathias Verraes:
Verbs in Class Names
October 07, 2013 @ 11:40:07

Mathias Verraes has an interesting post to his site suggesting that using verbs in class names can make for easier to understand and easier to read code - more "natural language."

When you first learned Object Oriented Programming, somebody probably told you that objects map to things. And that still holds true most of the time. And maybe somebody explained it using the simple heuristic to "look for the nouns", which can indeed be a great discovery technique. But then somebody probably phrased that as "class names should not have verbs in them". To me, that rule is severely limiting the possibilities for your models. So here are some cases where I prefer to use verbs.

He suggests that class names, in some cases, could be used as "messages" to the developers using them in the OOP. He includes some suggestions (based on the suggestion of nouns from another post) that use verb-names to convey what they're doing. He also talks about three specific cases - specifications, exceptions and interfaces - and includes samples of each using this idea of verb-based class names.

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verb class naming noun alternative example

Link: http://verraes.net/2013/10/verbs-in-class-names/

Reddit.com:
Let's Make PHP's Function Names Consistent!
January 25, 2013 @ 10:32:57

On Reddit.com there's a heated discussion going on in response to this bug filed asking about aliasing PHP function names to make them more consistent (specifically "htmlentities_decode" versus "html_entity_decode").

[...] Current naming conventions are really horrible. For instance, look at differences between str_replace, strlen, parse_str, htmlspecialchars. All work with same type but their names are completely different. So, string functions should go to String namespace (Stringreplace()), array functions to Array namespace (Arraysearch()) and so on.

Back in the Reddit post most of the commentors agree that this kind of thing would be beneficial to the language, but - as several point out - this could have serious backwards compatibility issues. What do you think? Voice your opinion!

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function naming consistency language opinion


Rafael Dohms' Blog:
Book Review The Art of Readable Code
February 29, 2012 @ 10:41:12

Rafael Dohms has posted a new review of a book that focuses on helping you create better, more readable code - "The Art of Readable Code" (Dustin Boswell, Trevor Foucher, O'Reilly). This is isn't about "pretty code" as much as it is manageable, easy to follow structures and logic flows.

"The Art of Readable Code" was written by Dustin Bowell and Trevor Foucher and basically focuses on concepts and suggestions to make you code not just readable, but comprehendible by other developers, or as the author's suggest, yourself in six months. Code readability is a topic that I truly believe the PHP community does not focus enough on and i really wanted a look at this book to see what kind of ideas it had and what I could do my best to bring to the attention of other developers.

The book is language-agnostic and provides ideas that developers should keep in mind when doing their development - clear variable names, making comments that make sense, refactoring tips and hints for implementing your ideas in code. He recommends the book to any developer (in any language) to help them make code that will stand the test of time and be easier to manage/understand in the future.

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code readable book review oreilly clean comment naming refactor testing


NETTUTS.com:
9 Confusing Naming Conventions for Beginners
October 25, 2010 @ 11:39:42

On NETTUTS.com there's a new article that list nine different conventions that developers (PHP, Javascript, general web) could get confused about when they are just starting out.

Especially when first getting started with various web development languages, it can prove to be a difficult task to learn all of the various naming conventions from language to language. This can be even more confusing when developers disagree on what's considered best practice. To help ease the transition for beginners, this list will describe some of the more common conventions.

Some of the conventions that they mention that are more specific to PHP developers are underscores before property names, uppercase constants, capitalized first letters in variables and alternative syntax (like ternary).

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naming convention beginner confusion


Emran Hasan' Blog:
Changing the default controller naming convention in CodeIgniter
September 21, 2009 @ 09:43:09

Emran Hasan has a quick new post to his blog today looking at how you can change the default controller naming scheme that the CodeIgniter framework uses (to prevent things like naming conflicts and the like).

CodeIgniter is one of my favorite framework and I often use it for developing application quickly. Although it is very flexible in most cases, I find its naming convention to be strict. Many times I have faced this problem when my controller's class name and a model/library's class names are the same '" a Fatal error is inevitable.

His method involves extending the core CI_Router class to change the _validate_request method to change the location and the naming convention (from Users to UsersController) for the default controller settings. Code for the update is included.

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codeigniter naming controller default tutorial


Shawn Straton's Blog:
Code Readability Part 2, Code Structure
January 19, 2009 @ 12:59:41

Shawn Straton has posted the second part of his look at code readability today. This time the focus is on the structure of the code - file structure, code layout, etc.

I've had the pleasure of maintaining a legacy application developed by people who were past deadline the second they had their assignment handed to them in the past and it can get really interesting rather quickly when you see how sloppy you can get when you are in such a hurry. Here are some guidelines I've given myself to ensure that the structure is correct at the end of the day.

Some of his suggestions include:

  • Breaking larger files apart into smaller, easier to maintain pieces
  • Correctly naming functions/variables/etc
  • Tabbing/spacing in to indent code blocks
  • Input validation and error checking should always be included
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readable maintain structure naming convention


Keith Casey's Blog:
Useful Naming Conventions
December 09, 2008 @ 15:31:15

In a new post to his blog Keith Casey shares a few tips on naming conventions that can help increase readability in your code and make maintenance simpler in the future.

In my regular web wanderings recently, I found a great post entitled "The 7 Worst Verbs Programmers Use In Function Calls" and couldn't help but be reminded of a system that I worked on a few years ago. The core function of the system was named - no kidding - "doStuff". Everything in the application led towards that, used it, and then did other things as a result.

He suggests a structure he uses - "verbAjectiveNounStructure". Starting with an action, moving to a description of the action, to the target of the action and finally an optional structure - how the returned data is formatted.

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useful naming convention verb adjective noun structure


IBM developerWorks:
Five good programming habits in PHP
December 04, 2008 @ 12:04:56

Nathan Good has posted five tips PHP developers should use in their work to develop good programming habits to the IBM developerWorks site today.

Just like any language, developers can write code in PHP that ranges in quality from truly awful to very good. Learn good programming habits that can help you bridge the productivity gap. [...] Bad coding habits seem to accompany defects in code and can cause code to be difficult to change without introducing new defects. The following five good habits, when applied to your PHP code, will help you avoid these pitfalls.

Here's the list:

  • Use good naming.
  • Take smaller bites.
  • Document your code.
  • Handle error conditions.
  • Never, ever, copy and paste.
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programming habit bestpractice document naming error copynpaste


Chris Hartjes' Blog:
Dynamic Models in CakePHP 1.2
August 06, 2008 @ 09:34:33

In this new post to his blog Chris Hartjes mentions a "nifty little feature" that the latest version of the CakePHP framework has - dynamic models.

By default now, Cake will automatically use the AppModel class and create a unique alias to a database table if it does not find the file. This means that if you have a table that follows the Cake conventions, needs no validation, and has no associations to other tables, you don't even have to create the model file any more. Woah, talk about a serious time saver in some cases.

He also mentions a gotcha to keep an eye out for - misspelling the model name when you use it. It'll definitely break things. You can find out more about models in CakePHP from this section in their manual, The Cookbook.

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dynamic model cakephp framework appmodel naming convention



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