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/Dev/Hell Podcast:
Episode 84: Whiny Feedback Loops
Oct 24, 2016 @ 12:33:23

The /Dev/Hell podcast, hosted by PHP community members Chris Hartjes and Ed Finkler, has posted their latest episode - Episode 84: Whiny Feedback Loops.

Chris and Ed record a very quick show to talk about Ed’s latest conference adventure, the launch of some new stuff from OSMI, and Chris talks about feedback loops, hoodies that don’t fit, and the end of TrueNorthPHP.

You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the show, be sure to follow their feed and follow them on Twitter for updates when new shows are released.

tagged: devhell podcast 84 feedback loop chrishartjes edfinkler

Link: http://devhell.info/post/2016-10-22/whiny-feedback-loops/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Picking the Brains of Your Customers with Microsoft’s Text Analytics
Oct 14, 2016 @ 12:19:21

In the latest tutorial posted to the SitePoint PHP blog author Wern Ancheta shows you how to integrate your application with the Microsoft Text Analytics API, a service offered by the company putting machine learning to work on things like keyword extraction, topic detection and language detection.

With the explosion of machine learning services in recent years, it has become easier than ever for developers to create “smart apps”. In this article, I’ll introduce you to Microsoft’s offering for providing machine-learning capabilities to apps. Specifically, you’ll learn about the Text Analytics API and build an app to enhance the understanding of online sellers when it comes to their customers.

The tutorial then introduces the Microsoft Cognitive Services API and, more specifically, the Text Analytics API that they'll be hooking the application in to. They walk you through getting an API key for the service, creating an "account" for the application you're working with and deploying it for immediate use. They introduce the functionality of the API with a few "play" examples of each API offered before getting into the creation of their sample application - a tool that reviews the contents of customer feedback, looking for key phrases and returns highlighted versions with what it sees as important.

tagged: customer tutorial text analytics microsoft machinelearning highlight feedback application slim3

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/picking-the-brains-of-your-customers-with-microsofts-text-analytics/

NetTuts.com:
Building Your Startup With PHP: Collecting and Managing User Reports and Feedback
Oct 11, 2016 @ 12:13:05

TutsPlus.com has posted the latest part of their "Building Your Startup with PHP" series following along with the creation of a "meeting planner" application based on the Yii2 framework. In this new article the focus is on collecting and managing user feedback and reports for a simple support system.

In this series, I'm guiding you through launching a startup from concept to reality using my Meeting Planner app as a real-life example. Every step along the way, I'll release the Meeting Planner code as open-source examples you can learn from. I'll also address startup-related business issues as they arise.

In this tutorial, I'm going to guide you through how I quickly and economically launched a support system and knowledge base for the application as well as some of the issues and alternatives I considered.

He starts with some of the third-party options he considered including Zendesk, Grove and Freshdesk. In the end he decided to go with the last option as it had the startup-friendly combination of a free account for small business and good functionality at that level. He covers their pricing levels, the signup process and the basic usage of the account and hooking it into Mailgun for sending/receiving emails. He also walks you through customizing the domain to match yours and updating the code to make the "Support" URLs match the new Freshdesk setup.

tagged: collect manage user feedback report startup tutorial series

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-your-startup-with-php-collecting-and-managing-user-reports-and-feedback--cms-23356

Three Devs and a Maybe:
Episode #98 - Instant Feedback on your Pizza Oven
May 19, 2016 @ 09:20:35

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast has released their latest episode today - Episode #98: Instant Feedback on your Pizza Oven, a discussion on quick feedback cycles, MVCC in Databases and Type Systems

On this weeks episode Edd and Mick start off discussion around productivity, quick feedback cycles with clients and building pizza ovens. We then move on to chat about how Edd ‘maybe’ accident prone, how MVCC works at a high-level and why you need to vacuum your tables in Postgres. Finally, we bring up Uncle Bob’s recent ‘Type Wars’ article and highlight the different variants of typing (static, dynamic, weak and strong).

You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly and enjoying at your leisure. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed and get the latest updates on new shows as they're released.

tagged: threedevsandamaybe podcast ep98 feedback mvvc database typing pizzaoven

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/instant-feedback-on-your-pizza-oven/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
The PHP Channel’s Survey Results and 2016 Plans
Jan 22, 2016 @ 10:12:46

A while back the SitePoint PHP blog did a survey asking for reader feedback about the content they provide, what they thought was good/bad about it and what they'd like to see more of in the future. In this new post they share some of these results.

On the last day of 2015, we published a survey asking you, the readers, for an opinion about the PHP channel. It was a pretty open survey with mostly freeform answers allowed, so you could tell us literally anything. All in all, we collected 78 responses so far (the survey will remain open indefinitely, in case someone wants to give us more feedback).

On the average satisfaction scale, we scored 7.42 out of 10, and that’s without excluding the potential trolls who voted 1. That’s a very good result, but we’re determined to improve it further.

The rest of the post then gets into the results in detail, talking about:

  • overall satisfaction with the blog and its contents
  • opinions on the newsletter
  • author feedback
  • favorite types of posts
  • their presence on social media

They end the post with a summary of the things people wanted the most out of the site including more demos/practical examples and more PHP 7-related content. While these results are mostly applicable to the SitePoint PHP blog, they also can be applied a bit more widely across the community and on other sites that publish articles with technical content.

tagged: sitepoint channel survey results article feedback

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/the-php-channels-survey-results-and-2016-plans/

Joshua Thijssen:
My guide to commenting on joind.in
Dec 21, 2015 @ 10:44:16

If you've been to any PHP conference (or attended a PHP-related online event) in recent years, you probably have heard of the speaker/event feedback site Joind.in. The concept is simple: when you attend a talk or event you go to the site, give the speaker a star rating and leave them comments. This gives the speakers direct feedback on how they did and where they can improve. There's a a trick to giving valuable feedback, though, and Joshua Thijssen has posted some helpful tips to guide you and your comments in the right direction.

The joind.in website can be considered a presenter’s portfolio: it contains a list of talks they have done in the past (and where), plus it contains reviews from attendees. [...] This is why many conferences and presenters will talk about joind.in and ask you to rate and comments on their talks: it gives them feedback on how you experienced the talk, what can be improved to make it even better, and gives the presenters more chance to get accepted on even the larger conferences, where sometimes there are only 50 slots, but over 500 people submitted talks).

[...] Even though commenting and rating talks by itself isn’t really difficult and is quick to do so, there are some common “mistakes” and pitfalls which I’d like to discuss.

He breaks it down into five main points, elaborating on each as he goes through them:

  1. Stars don’t tell you everything
  2. Rate the presentation and speaker, not your expectations.
  3. Don’t punish the presenter for external faults
  4. Comment anonymously
  5. Give suggestions on how to improve

For each one he also gives examples of good feedback versus comments that aren't as helpful to the speaker. Each one of these is an easy trap to slip in to, so remember them next time you're giving a speaker feedback (even if it's not on Joind.in!).

tagged: speaker feedback useful commenting joindin event conference guide

Link: https://adayinthelifeof.nl/2015/12/17/commenting-on-joindin.html

Reddit.com:
How do you see the PHP-FIG?
Dec 14, 2015 @ 09:48:49

There's been a big discussion happening over on the PHP-FIG (Framework Interoperability Group) mailing list recently about the goals and vision for the project. While the group originally started out as a way to define standards for frameworks and projects to work together, some have begun to wonder if it's a bit more far reaching than that. This discussion/poll on Reddit sums up the question nicely:

There are some ongoing discussions on the PHP-FIG mailing list about, among other things, how the FIG is seen by the wider PHP community. [...] Since an earlier discussion pointed out that perhaps the FIG, while well-known, don't do enough "active outreach", consider this an attempt to "reach out."

Do you think:

  • The FIG is a bunch of self-aggrandizing elitist jerks who couldn't write a competent or useful "proposed standards recommendation" if their lives depended on it, and should disband entirely.
  • The FIG, while aware that the wider PHP community is watching, writes PSRs primarily for itself, and others can adopt or ignore as they wish;
  • The FIG has become the closest thing to a userland standards group that the PHP community has, and should accept that role;
  • Some other opinion?

There's already 50+ comments on the thread with several of the options being supported. There seems to be a leaning towards either the second option or the third with advantages and disadvantages for both. The group has undoubtably helped to change the way that modern PHP is written and they want to keep the tradition going and be what the community and language need. Go over an voice your own opinion on the matter too!

tagged: phpfig organization opinion poll standards community feedback interoperability

Link: https://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/3wownq/how_do_you_see_the_phpfig/

Community News:
PHP 7 Has Arrived (and Everyone's Talking About It)
Dec 04, 2015 @ 09:58:09

The big news in the PHP ecosystem is the release of the stable version of PHP 7.0.0. This was officially released late yesterday and the response has already been great. Members of the PHP community (and some companies) have also posted about the release too:

These also come along with a whole host of tweets about the PHP 7 release too. If you have a post you'd like to have added to this list and I've just missed it, let me know and I'll drop it in!

tagged: community article blog feedback php7 twitter

Link: http://phpdeveloper.org

Paul Jones:
SQL Schema Naming Conventions
Nov 04, 2015 @ 12:15:59

Paul Jones has a post to his site looking at SQL schema naming conventions and some of his own thoughts on the matter. There's a lot of different camps of thought around naming, much less database ones, and he makes a few suggestions learned from his experience over time.

Several weeks ago I asked on Twitter for SQL schema naming conventions from DBA professionals. (I’m always interested in the generally-accepted practices of related professions; when I can, I try to make my work as compatible with theirs as possible.)

I got back only a handful of responses, representing MySQL, PostgreSQL, and DB2 administrators, really not enough for a statistically useful sample. Even so, I’m going to present their anonymized responses here, because they led me to work I had not previously considered at length.

He asked about things like singular vs plural names, primary key choices and naming of association tables. The uses the rest of the post sharing the responses he got from his questions with a good range of responses representing both sides of each question. He wraps up the post looking at what these answers mean to the average developer and the answers that Joe Celko and Simon Holywell have to say on the matter.

tagged: sql schema naming convention feedback table primarykey association feedback

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6188

Paul Jones:
SQL Schema Naming Conventions
Nov 04, 2015 @ 12:15:59

Paul Jones has a post to his site looking at SQL schema naming conventions and some of his own thoughts on the matter. There's a lot of different camps of thought around naming, much less database ones, and he makes a few suggestions learned from his experience over time.

Several weeks ago I asked on Twitter for SQL schema naming conventions from DBA professionals. (I’m always interested in the generally-accepted practices of related professions; when I can, I try to make my work as compatible with theirs as possible.)

I got back only a handful of responses, representing MySQL, PostgreSQL, and DB2 administrators, really not enough for a statistically useful sample. Even so, I’m going to present their anonymized responses here, because they led me to work I had not previously considered at length.

He asked about things like singular vs plural names, primary key choices and naming of association tables. The uses the rest of the post sharing the responses he got from his questions with a good range of responses representing both sides of each question. He wraps up the post looking at what these answers mean to the average developer and the answers that Joe Celko and Simon Holywell have to say on the matter.

tagged: sql schema naming convention feedback table primarykey association feedback

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6188