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Cal Evans:
The secret to writing a job post to attract PHP developers
August 18, 2014 @ 12:17:42

Cal Evans has posted another in his series looking at the right things to do when writing job posts and trying to attract developers for your company. In his previous posts he's talked about building a good team and getting the jobs page right. In his latest post he talks about a secret to writing the post itself: keeping it simple.

Is your company trying to hire a developer? Are you a recruiter responsible for helping your client hire a PHP developer? Do you have a job post out on the net? Get this one thing right and you'll find your PHP developer. Yes, that's the entire secret; keep it simple. Make it easy for us to scan, easy for us to understand, easy for us to figure out how to apply.

He includes a few points to follow to help guide you into the "keep it simple" approach including avoiding "semantically null terms" and listing the minimum skills for the job, not everything you could possibly need.

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Link: http://blog.calevans.com/2014/08/15/the-secret-to-writing-a-job-post-to-attract-php-developers/

WebLessons.info:
Login with LinkedIn
June 25, 2014 @ 10:47:16

The WebLessons.info site has a new tutorial posted showing you how to use the LinkedIn authentication handling to allow your users to log in with their own account information.

LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking service. It is mainly used for professional networking. So if you are having an application or website that serves working professionals then its very important for you to implement login with LinkedIn in your application. By this way you can able to access the data of your users like email, work history, education etc. So now let's dive into the coding part.

They walk you through the various steps, providing screenshots or code where applicable:

  • Creating a LinkedIn Application
  • Get the API Key and Secret Key
  • Create the database and set up the PHP configuration to connect
  • finally, the PHP code for the login form and making the request to LinkedIn

A live demo can be found here (but if you're paranoid about your credentials, I wouldn't use it) and you can download all files included in the tutorial.

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Link: http://weblessons.info/2014/06/25/login-with-linkedin-tutorial-php/

Jeremy Kendall:
API Query Authentication With Query Auth
August 15, 2013 @ 09:41:46

Jerermy Kendall has written up a post for his site showing the use of his QueryAuth library for API authentication, complete with plenty of examples. The library makes it simple to sign and verify requests based on a key, secret and parameters given.

Most APIs require some sort of query authentication: a method of signing API requests with an API key and signature. The signature is usually generated using a shared secret. When you're consuming an API, there are (hopefully) easy to follow steps to create signatures. When you're writing your own API, you have to whip up both server-side signature validation and a client-side signature creation strategy. Query Auth endeavors to handle both of those tasks; signature creation and signature validation.

He includes code examples showing how to create a signed request, validate the signature from an incoming request and generate randomized keys and secrets. He's also created a sample implementation as a Vagrant box that sets up a Slim framework based application and uses Guzzle to make requests. He briefly looks at some of the code that makes it work and what the raw HTTP request and response look like for the result.

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Link: http://jeremykendall.net/2013/08/13/api-query-authentication-with-query-auth

Michael Nitschinger's Blog:
Session Encryption with Lithium
January 20, 2012 @ 12:09:08

Michael Nitschinger has a new post for the Lithium framework users out there - a quick tutorial about encrypting your session information with the new built in "Encrypt" strategy feature.

If you check out the master branch, you can use the new Encrypt strategy to encrypt your session data automatically. This means that you can read and write session data in cleartext and they will be encrypted on the fly before getting stored (in a cookie, for example).

You'll need the mcrypt extension installed for it to work correctly, but it makes storing the encrypted version of your data more or less automatic. Just set up your Session configuration to use it as a strategy and any time you call a "read" or "write" the hard work is handled for you. For those more interests in what's "under the hood" he goes on to talk about how the strategy works, what cipher it uses by default, how to change it and the default string to use in hashing.

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Lorna Mitchell' Blog:
PHP OAuth Provider Access Tokens
August 30, 2011 @ 08:28:04

Lorna Mitchell has posted the latest in her look at OAuth in PHP to her blog today, an introduction to access tokens - generating and handling them in your application.

I've been working with OAuth, as a provider and consumer, and there isn't a lot of documentation around it for PHP at the moment so I thought I'd share my experience in this series of articles. [...] This entry follows on from the ones about the initial requirements, how to how to handle request tokens, and authenticating users.

In this latest post, she talks about the three different types of tokens - consumer, request and verififier - and how to use them to locate a user in your app's users. Her code validates the request token and verifier against the database and, if successful, inserts the rest of the token information for the user.

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Zend Developer Zone:
Getting an OAuth Access Token from the Command Line
June 09, 2011 @ 11:04:29

Tim Lytle has written up a new tutorial for the Zend Developer Zone talking about OAuth and making one of the more difficult parts - getting an access token - a bit simpler using a command-line application.

OAuth is great - there's no need to save users' passwords, it's - in theory - a consistent way to interact with other services, and it's hopefully something that your users are familiar and comfortable using. But if you're not just interacting with your users' accounts - for example, your application uses a single account on a service to broadcast messages, or analyze data - getting or renewing the access token can be painful.

He illustrates the problem with an example connecting to Twitter and even points out a script that makes bridging this gap simpler. Unfortunately, it's not exactly what he needed, so he reworked the idea with a call to the Twitter API using a Zend_Oauth_Consumer and a custom callback. The script is then set up with some command line options for inputting the key and secret information. Also included is functionality letting you define a configuration file. You can see the final result here on github.

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Cal Evans' Blog:
Accessing Twitter via Zend_Service_Twitter
January 25, 2011 @ 12:08:49

In this new post to his blog Cal Evans talks about a project he was working on that needed to interface with Twitter via their API. This, of course, requires OAuth but his script is all backend and Twitter requires a frontend to allow the application access.

There is no front end at all. It just collects info and stores it in a database so I can query it later. (I'm an old-school database guy and love just writing ad-hoc queries to see what I can see) Twitter wants to redirect you to a site once you have authorized access. Since I don't actually have a site to redirect it to, this was a problem.

His solution ("in two parts") involves tips from two different blog posts - this tutorial from Michelangelo van Dam and the other from Jaisen Mathai about using OAuth with Twitter. He's not releasing the source for his script just yet, though, so you'll have to do a little research on your own.

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Lorna Mitchell's Blog:
Authenticating with OAuth from PHP
September 29, 2010 @ 08:18:32

Lorna Mitchell has posted about her experiences with getting OAuth working with her PHP application by way of the PECL package that adds support into PHP.

I've been looking into OAuth recently and really like what I see, so I started looking at actually starting to play with something that uses it (and isn't twitter). In the pursuit of this, I spent some time walking through the process of how to actually authenticate using OAuth, as a client.

She briefly touches on the consumer key and secret and how those are passed along with the OAuth object creation to grab a request token, complete with details on setting a callback. She also mentions how to grab an access token - a piece of information you include in your API calls to let the remote service know who you are. All of her examples are using Yahoo! OAuth services.

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Nettuts.com:
Unraveling the Secrets of WordPress' Comments.php File
May 30, 2008 @ 11:18:54

The Nettuts site has posted a detailed guide to the "comments.php" file that comes with every release of WordPress:

WordPress seems to be everywhere these days, and it's no wonder with it's ease of use and ease of customization. In this tutorial, I'll be dissecting the default WordPress theme's comments.php structure and giving you various snippets of code to make your skinning easier.

The guide breaks down the major parts of the file - some of the general code, how it displays comments, the comment submission form and some "little tricks" it does to handle things like comment numbers, links and the alternating colors.

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Adam Trachtenberg's Blog:
Dirty Secrets of OSCON 2006
August 08, 2006 @ 05:46:06

Adam Trachtenberg has posted, according to this new item on his blog, the slides from his presentation at this year's OSCON. The title of the talk? "Dirty Secrets of PHP 5's ext/soap Extension."

The slides [pdf] summarizes his talk, described as:

PHP 5's ext/SOAP extension is an excellent web services client. However, while the easy things are easy, lack of documentation means the hard things can appear downright impossible. Starting with SOAPClient basics and building upwards, learn the hidden secrets necessary to conquer even the strangest WSDL.

In the presentation, he not only describes the functionality the PHP 5 extension offers, but provides a few simple code examples to help with the explaination.

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