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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Crash Course into Continuous Testing with Sismo
Mar 29, 2016 @ 12:03:54

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a tutorial posted helping you get started with Sismo, a simple component that can help you with the continuous testing of your PHP applications. Sismo is a project from SensioLabs, the same group behind Symfony and Twig (and several other popular tools).

The PHP community started to adopt the testing culture relatively recently. Despite there being some debates on how to achieve this, nobody can argue the importance of having your code fully covered by tests. In this article, we’re going to explore a tool that will help you in a major part of the testing culture called continuous testing.

Sismo is a small component which you can easily integrate with your projects to make the process of continuous testing easier. Sismo's main focus is to run your tests and send you status notifications.

They help you get the tool installed (either from GitHub or directly) and configure your project with a simple PHP file. They also include instructions on how to execute the tests for the project and an example of the resulting output. The tutorial then shows how to set up a project using the remote repository handling, setting up notifiers for failures, storing the build information and using it in a git hook.

tagged: continuous testing sismo sensiolabs tutorial setup configuration phpunit test

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/continuous-testing-with-sismo/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Easy Continuous Delivery with ContinuousPHP and Zend Server
Dec 10, 2015 @ 12:54:32

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial from author Daniel Berman showing you how to combine the ContinuousPHP service with Zend Server to create a continuous deployment system for your PHP applications.

The continuous delivery approach aims at making the process of continuously deploying code to production error-free, or at least less error-prone, using automated tasks, tests, builds and deployments. Minimize risk and downtime, maximize quality and value. That’s the motto.

However, this process is not always straightforward, to say the least. Often enough, the continuous delivery tools chosen for implementing continuous integration and deployment are hard to figure out and use, and are usually time consuming and expensive. The bigger the application, the bigger the challenge. This article introduces an interesting new approach to dealing with this challenge by demonstrating a continuous delivery process using continuousphp and Zend Server.

They briefly walk you through some of the prerequisites including an installation of Zend Server already set up and waiting. He also provides a skeleton application you can use if you just want to test it out first. From there he goes through the steps in the process:

  • Setting up your repository (on ContinuousPHP)
  • Creating a new deployment pipeline
  • Configuring build and test settings
  • Packaging and deploying your app

All along the way he's included screenshots of the ContinuousPHP interface so you can be sure you're still on the right track. He ends the post with a few extra "goodies" linking directly to the ContinuousPHP and Zend server documentation among other useful links.

tagged: zendserver tutorial continuousphp service setup configure continuous deployment

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/easy-continuous-delivery-with-continuousphp-and-zend-server/

Dutch Web Alliance:
Continuous Learning
Nov 13, 2015 @ 10:45:57

On the Dutch Web Alliance site today Stefan Koopmanschap makes a recommendation about something that can help make you a better developer and grow in your knowledge: continuous learning.

Education. In a fast-changing environment such as the web industry, education is the single most important thing to survive. [...] We need to stay up-to-date on those subjects to ensure we keep doing the right things in the right ways. It is impossible to keep your knowledge on everything up-to-date and still have enough time to work, so we need to make choices on which topics to focus on and how to learn. In this article I’ll go into some strategies and some ways to keep the knowledge of you and your team current.

He covers lots of good topics, including a brief summary of each point as he goes (including deciding if you want to be a generalist or specialist). He goes through several places to gain this kind of knowledge including:

  • Knowledge sessions
  • Trainings
  • Code kata
  • Code reviews
  • Mentoring

...and these are just some of the places. He also points out the value of learning something on your own every day, trying out something outside of your usual solutions and remembering that "no two challenges are the same".

tagged: continuous learning resources generalist specialist knowledge

Link: https://dutchweballiance.nl/techblog/continuous-learning/

Marc Morera:
Composer Install in CI
Sep 29, 2015 @ 10:48:38

In this post to his site Marc Morera talks about Composer dependencies and an issue that can come up with two things: having a large number of dependencies and minimum PHP version requirements (and when they change).

Any final project needs a lot of dependencies, and even if your composer.json file is small, you may need a dependency with a lot of dependencies. [...] Computing the real dependencies in my environment seems a great solution, right? I run composer update in my computer, I update the composer.lock version in the repository, and then I only need to do composer install. What I reduce here is the computing time of all recursive dependencies from 20+ minutes to less than 5 minutes. [...] Why this is a bad solution?

He explains that some projects will change the PHP version requirement in a minor version, potentially causing your build to break on other versions without you changing anything. He points out that there's "no good solution" he sees but does recommend good upkeep of your composer.json as a composer update is the best course of action. He also makes recommendations to the library developers about keeping requirements scope as wide as possible and only defining specifics when the project is finalized.

tagged: composer install continuous integration update dependencies

Link: http://mmoreram.com/blog/2015/09/28/composer-install-in-ci/

Lakion Blog:
Easy debugging on CI with Mink
Sep 18, 2015 @ 09:44:12

On the Lakion blog there's a post showing you how to debug your application's Behat tests easily as a part of your continuous integration process. In thieir case, they were trying to figure out why builds were breaking on a Travis-CI build instance.

Debugging Behat scenarios while using Mink to simulate the user is not always an easy job. Especially, if they are run on Continuous Integration server. That is why I came up with an idea to make it easier. During repairing our javascript test suite on Sylius everything went as bad as it could go. There were many errors that happened on Travis, but I was not able to reproduce them locally. [...] MinkDebugExtension was written to speed up that boring and tiring part of debugging on CI server. It consists of two parts: Behat extension and useful scripts.

The extension fires after failed steps and makes a log of the issue with content needed to recreate the issue (including possible screenshots). He also describes the scripts that come with it to help you browse through the results, uploading the resulting logs and screenshots to a place for public consumption.

tagged: mink easy debug travisci continuous integration extension log screenshot

Link: http://lakion.com/blog/mink-debug-extension

Symfony Blog:
How we Auto-Deploy Documentation Pull Requests with Platform.sh
Sep 10, 2015 @ 12:42:38

On the Symfony blog Ryan Weaver shares a "behind the scenes" look at how the project handles and has automated their documentation generation process with the help of the Platform.sh service.

[Symfony's documentation](https://github.com/symfony/symfony-docs) is an open source project with more than 800 contributors. That’s great! But our goal is to always make it easier to contribute and faster to merge in changes. And today, we’ve started doing something really cool to improve our workflow: integration with [Platform.sh](https://platform.sh).

Platform.sh is a hosting solution that provides out-of-the-box continuous deployment for Symfony, Drupal and any other PHP applications. It extends the concept of a Git branch at the infrastructure level. Basically, this means that it’s easy to deploy every branch and/or Pull Request to its own URL.

He talks about the documentation's format (Sphinx) and how, while it does provide flexibility it also can lead to maintenance issues too. Changes can't be seen immediately and it's difficult to review. Instead they worked up a process where each pull request was automatically deployed to its own unique URL. This reduces both issues they were setting around instant feedback and review problems and provides a better experience for the developer overall.

tagged: integration platformsh documentation request pull symfony continuous deployment

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/how-we-auto-deploy-documentation-pull-requests-with-platform-sh

Piotr Pasich:
Putting all pieces together and shipping with Codeship (Continuous Deployment – part I
Aug 18, 2015 @ 12:45:01

Piotr Pasich continues his series covering the integration of Docker, Elastic Beanstalk and Codeship to create a workflow for shipping and releasing code. In the first two parts of the series he set up most of the technology involved and hooked some of it together. In this latest article he finishes the process, connecting CodeShip with GitHub and your tests.

Today I will walk you through combining all the pieces together and automating the process fully. A continuous integration system will be placed between developer’s environment and final servers. I’ll present how to achieve all of that with Codeship. What make me choose this particular mechanism? The simplicity of setting up, number of additional tools ready to use without installation and finally the fact that it isn’t time consuming.

He shows how to connect CodeShip with your GitHub repository. He shows how to create a new CodeShip project to handle the build complete with a screencast to ensure things are set up as they should be. He includes a bit of "magic" you'll need to do with the CodeShip configuration to get it to work with the Docker setup, but the change is minimal. He also shows you how to set up the execution of your tests and how to see what failed when a build is broken. Finally he shows the process for setting up the deployment to the hosting provider (in this case Digital Ocean) and how to configure your Amazon credentials right in the interface.

tagged: codeship elasticbeanstalk continuous deployment series part3 docker tutorial

Link: http://piotrpasich.com/putting-all-pieces-together-and-shipping-with-codeship-continuous-deployment-part-iii/

Engine Yard Blog:
Composer & Continuous Integration
Apr 29, 2015 @ 09:14:11

In a new post to the Engine Yard blog Nils Adermann provides an overview of using Composer with continuous integration, its role in the overall process and some good practices to follow in its use.

Continous Integration (CI) is the practice of continuously (and automatically) testing every change a developer makes. So automated tests become an integral part of the development process providing direct feedback on changes made. [...] Davey Shafik's article on Composer's Lock File explains the typical usage of composer install and update. The key takeaway is that developers should run composer update manually to explicitly update individual dependencies while composer install should be used in automated processes. This principle includes automated test environments.

He points out that using the lock file method reproduces the vendor directory exactly as it is in production and what it means for failures in your automated tests. He also talks about methods to improve the build performance to reduce time spent during the generation of the environment, including the use of the Composer cache data. He includes a few flags you can pass to Composer to reduce not only the libraries it installs but also how it fetches their contents.

tagged: composer continuous integration build process performance automated test composerlock

Link: https://blog.engineyard.com/2015/composer-continuous-integration

Zend Blog:
Continuous Delivery: The Benefits and Barriers of Automation
Feb 10, 2015 @ 12:09:08

On the Zend blog there's a new post that looks at one of the major steps when you start to think about automation in the deployment of your application - continuous delivery.

For many, the process of manually developing and deploying software to production is archaic at best. Even in highly automated software development environments, at least one developer (although often more) typically manages modifications to code and software products, and the ramifications of these modifications can be extensive or unknown. [...] The emerging process for developing and deploying applications of high quality is one that is highly automated, executing continuously, and covers the entire development process, from modifying code through testing to deployment. Automation provides analysis that flags code for improvement and executes full regression tests every time a modification is made.

[...] This process is called continuous delivery, and automation is a key component of a mature continuous delivery process, which includes: continuous integration, infrastructure automation, and release automation.

After the introduction, they get into some of the basic concepts of continuous delivery and what kinds of steps can make up the full process. From there they get into some of the benefits of its introduction including lower staffing costs and enhanced teamwork. They balance this out with two barriers that could prevent adoption - the initial cost and the organization culture considerations that would need to change.

tagged: continuous delivery deployment benefits barriers automation

Link: http://blog.zend.com/2015/02/09/continuous-delivery-the-benefits-and-barriers-of-automation/

Dutch Web Alliance:
Capifony, Continuous Deployment and Symfony’s parameter.yml
Dec 15, 2014 @ 12:10:50

On the Dutch Web Alliance site today they've posted a tutorial about their use of Capifony for Symfony application deployment and how it relates to updating the "parameter.yml" file. They describe their current deployment process, how it works with the different environments and how they solved the one manually problem they had.

The actual deployment is thus dealt with by capifony. This is a plugin for capistrano written for deploying Symfony applications. [...] Capifony automatically deals with cloning the correct branch on the servers, installing dependencies through composer, migrating database versions etc etc. Basically we don’t have to care about anything else. However, there is one single thing that still keeps on bugging us: when we want to upgrade to a new parameters.yml, we must do this manually. This means that our builds will break when we deploy a version that requires an updated parameters.yml until we manually solve the issue.

To get around this manual issue, they decided on creating a new Capifony task that does an upload/download of the parameters file, depending on the environment.The continuous deployment can then push or pull the file as needed in a more automatic way.

tagged: continuous deployment paramatersyml configuration capifony capistrano task

Link: https://dutchweballiance.nl/techblog/capifony-continuous-deployment-symfonys-parameter-yml/