Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Cal Evans:
Five influencers you should thank this year for making the PHP community so awesome
Dec 22, 2014 @ 11:47:56

Cal Evans, PHP community member extraordinaire, has a new post sharing his suggestions of the top five influencers in the PHP community that "make it awesome" and help make it one of the best he's been involved in.

It is no surprise to anyone who has talked to me for more than five minutes that I think the PHP community is the most vibrant and engaging developer community out there. So as we approach the end of the year, I am going to list out the influencers that help keep this community at the top. These are the people that you need to seek out and thank because without them, the PHP community would not be what it is today.

He goes with categories rather than mentioning names (because, really, there's way too many too name them all):

  • 5: Core Developers
  • 4: User Group Leaders
  • 3: Conference Organizers
  • 2: Conference Speakers, Bloggers, and Teachers
  • 1: Any developer using PHP

That last one, while it might seem like an "everyone else" kind of category, is one of the most important in my opinion. After all, what is a language without its users. Core developers and community group/event leaders wouldn't have anything to talk about if no one was there to talk. There would be no one to teach or be taught to and the core developers wouldn't have any reason to drive the language forward. Even if you're not well-known in the PHP community, you and your code are making a contribution to the community, even if only in a small way.

tagged: top5 influencers thank opinion list core usergroup conference users blogger teacher

Link: http://blog.calevans.com/2014/12/21/five-influencers-thank-year-making-php-community-awesome/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Legacy Code is a Cancer
Aug 04, 2014 @ 11:08:45

In the latest post to the SitePoint PHP blog Bruno Skvorc proposes the idea that "legacy code is a cancer" that can influence decisions and technology choices that shy away from the new and possibly more functional alternatives.

This might come out controversial, but I firmly believe there is no room for legacy code in modern systems. Allow me to elaborate before you sharpen your pitchfork and light your torch. What I mean by that is: there should be absolutely zero reason to keep implementing the functions you’re adding to the new version retroactively into the old version, just because some people are still using it, even if the people using it are a vast majority.

He talks about the "support everything for as long as we can" ideal and how it can come back to bite you in the end. He suggests that, at some point, the v1 users have to "be discarded" and dropped for the upgraded version of the application. He talks about failure potentially brining around success and compares applications versus libraries and components and the upgrade path for each. He ends the post with a suggested upgrade path to move the system itself away from legacy support and into the new, latest version.

tagged: legacy code cancer maintenance upgrade support users

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/legacy-code-cancer/

CoderWall.com:
Scale PHP on Ec2 to 30,000 Concurrent Users / Server
Jul 19, 2013 @ 11:07:08

On CoderWall.com there's a post sharing some findings about how RockThePost.com scaled PHP to 30,000 concurrent users on Amazon EC2 instances.

RockThePost.com is a LAMP stack hosted on Ec2. We're preparing to be featured in an email which will be sent to ~1M investors... all at the same time. For our 2 person engineering department, that meant we had to do a quick sanity check to see just how many people we can support concurrently.

They have a list of five suggestions/opinions on what has helped them scale out to this level including using Varnish for caching, turning on APC (PHP opcode caching) and using a c1.xlarge EC2 instance. They used Google Analytics and Siege to run their load testing on the "exterior" of the site.

tagged: rockthepost scale amazon ec2 concurrent users howto

Link: https://coderwall.com/p/__z9ia

Symfony Blog:
Getting help on symfony1 or Symfony2
Jun 24, 2011 @ 09:02:02

On the Symfony blog Fabien Potencier has a new post talking about a change in the support structure for developers wanting to get help with either Symfony1 or Symfony2 - a split in the mailing list to help make things a bit easier to split out.

Now that Symfony2 is just around the corner, we need to better organize community support for both symfony1 and Symfony2. As more people start using Symfony2, the user mailing-list is becoming more and more difficult to follow. [...] After an opinionated discussion on the mailing-list, I've decided to create two new mailing-lists that are replacing the current users mailing-list: one for symfony1 and another one for Symfony2. The current mailing-list has been switched to the archive mode; all messages will remain browseable and searchable but new messages will be rejected.

If you're a current member of the "users" mailing list and want a similar experience, you'll need to subscribe to both. Otherwise, pick the one you like and watch your inbox fill up. This break up makes it easier for people to find messages specifically related to their version of choice without having to look for the "[Symfony2]" tag in the subject line.

tagged: symfony1 symfony2 framework mailing list split users

Link:

New Earth Online:
Detecting Users Online
Jan 02, 2007 @ 14:42:00

From the New Earth Online website, there comes this new tutorial for showing the current number of people browsing your website.

After recently having seen a way of showing the number of people currently visiting your site by recording IP address I thought I'd demonstrate my own way of doing it that also includes the ability to show which users online, and number of users/guests online.

They briefly explain the goal of the script and touch on another tool for WordPress that does a similar thing, but this solution would work for any site. The rest of the post is the code for the feature that uses a database table to keep track of users online (via insert/update/deletes).

tagged: detect users online count guest example detect users online count guest example

Link:

New Earth Online:
Detecting Users Online
Jan 02, 2007 @ 14:42:00

From the New Earth Online website, there comes this new tutorial for showing the current number of people browsing your website.

After recently having seen a way of showing the number of people currently visiting your site by recording IP address I thought I'd demonstrate my own way of doing it that also includes the ability to show which users online, and number of users/guests online.

They briefly explain the goal of the script and touch on another tool for WordPress that does a similar thing, but this solution would work for any site. The rest of the post is the code for the feature that uses a database table to keep track of users online (via insert/update/deletes).

tagged: detect users online count guest example detect users online count guest example

Link:

DevShed:
Creating the Admin Script for a PHP/MySQL Blogging System (Part 3)
Oct 17, 2006 @ 11:23:00

DevShed continues their look at the creation of a simple blogging script with part three of the series (part 1, part 2) - the creation of an admin utility to work with the contents of the blog.

The idea is to give the owner of the blog the ability to manage the blog by being able to remove users and articles as required, or to alter the status of users by upgrading them to admin status or banning them. It is also a place where the administrator can start new topics that will then garner their own replies.

They go through the creation of the main admin script (functionality managed with a switch statement, including other external PHP files) and the functions that go in each of those individual files to make things work - managing messages, managing users, and managing categories.

tagged: blogging system part3 mysql admin users messages categories blogging system part3 mysql admin users messages categories

Link:

DevShed:
Creating the Admin Script for a PHP/MySQL Blogging System (Part 3)
Oct 17, 2006 @ 11:23:00

DevShed continues their look at the creation of a simple blogging script with part three of the series (part 1, part 2) - the creation of an admin utility to work with the contents of the blog.

The idea is to give the owner of the blog the ability to manage the blog by being able to remove users and articles as required, or to alter the status of users by upgrading them to admin status or banning them. It is also a place where the administrator can start new topics that will then garner their own replies.

They go through the creation of the main admin script (functionality managed with a switch statement, including other external PHP files) and the functions that go in each of those individual files to make things work - managing messages, managing users, and managing categories.

tagged: blogging system part3 mysql admin users messages categories blogging system part3 mysql admin users messages categories

Link:

NewsForge.com:
Using phpMyAdmin
Aug 18, 2006 @ 07:11:33

On NewsForge, an article with a look at phpMyAdmin has been posted, a "getting started" guide for those not familiar with the software.

So many open source projects depend on MySQL that it's almost impossible for administrators and other open source enthusiasts to avoid working with at least one MySQL database. MySQL's command line interface is easy enough to use, but if you don't feel like reaching for a five-pound MySQL reference book or Googling for proper SQL syntax, phpMyAdmin is a great alternative to learning MySQL commands by heart.

They take a brief look at how it's set up, though it's not an installation tutorial, more about configuration. They guide you through some of the interface before getting to the real functionality - inserts, selects, dumping/restoring data, working with users, and checking/repairing tables when things go awry.

tagged: using phpmyadmin guide introduction configure insert users data repair using phpmyadmin guide introduction configure insert users data repair

Link:

NewsForge.com:
Using phpMyAdmin
Aug 18, 2006 @ 07:11:33

On NewsForge, an article with a look at phpMyAdmin has been posted, a "getting started" guide for those not familiar with the software.

So many open source projects depend on MySQL that it's almost impossible for administrators and other open source enthusiasts to avoid working with at least one MySQL database. MySQL's command line interface is easy enough to use, but if you don't feel like reaching for a five-pound MySQL reference book or Googling for proper SQL syntax, phpMyAdmin is a great alternative to learning MySQL commands by heart.

They take a brief look at how it's set up, though it's not an installation tutorial, more about configuration. They guide you through some of the interface before getting to the real functionality - inserts, selects, dumping/restoring data, working with users, and checking/repairing tables when things go awry.

tagged: using phpmyadmin guide introduction configure insert users data repair using phpmyadmin guide introduction configure insert users data repair

Link: