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Phillip Shipley:
How to automatically deploy static single-page-apps to Amazon S3 and Cloudfront or
Jun 02, 2017 @ 10:39:26

Phillip Shipley has a post to his site for the AWS and Cloudflare users out there (or those that want to use these together) about an easy way to automatically deploy static sites.

Managing web servers can be a lot of work. Especially when it comes to configuring and maintaining SSL certs, server and software updates, etc. Let’s Encrypt has made the SSL part a lot easier, but it is still work and to me feels like overkill for something as simple as a static single-page-application. Especially when there are dead simple solutions like Amazon S3 that can be used to host and scale a static website without any server configuration or maintenance. Adding CloudFront with a free SSL certificate from Amazon’s Certificate Manager service make SSL painless too.

[...] In this article I’ll cover how to use Codeship’s continuous integration and deployment service to build/test your app, deploy it to S3, and then clear cached versions of it from CloudFront and Cloudflare.

He then shows how to use the Codeship service to do the actual deployment, broken down into a few steps:

  • Step 1: Setting up project in Codeship
  • Step 2: Configure Tests
  • Step 3: Configure Environment Variables
  • Step 4: Configure Deployment

Each step includes both screenshots and configuration examples you'll need to get the workflow set up and running for your site.

tagged: deploy tutorial singlepage amazon s3 cloudfront cloudflare codeship process

Link: http://www.phillipshipley.com/2017/05/how-to-automatically-deploy-single-page-apps-to-amazon-s3-and-cloudfront-or-cloudflare-using-codeship/

Delicious Brains Blog:
Building a Command Line Daemon in PHP to Emulate AWS SQSD
May 30, 2017 @ 09:45:39

On the Delicious Brains site they've posted a tutorial showing how to create a command line daemon that will emulate the Amazon Web Services SQSD handling. The SQSD is a worker daemon service that Amazon offers as a part of its Elastic Beanstalk support.

Sometimes when you’re building a project there are parts of the architecture that exist on production that don’t exist on your development machine. Those missing parts (like proprietary software that’s specific to your hosting provider) can sometimes mean unwelcome surprises when you deploy to production.

Recently as part of my work on Mergebot, I decided to address this. My local machine was missing the AWS Elastic Beanstalk Worker Environment SQS daemon (known as SQSD). AWS isn’t open source so there’s, unfortunately, no official way to replicate it. So I decided to build a small PHP command line (CLI) app to attempt to replicate its functionality. In this article, I’m going to cover some of the aspects of creating a command line app in PHP and explain how I implemented them for my replica SQSD CLI.

He starts off with a brief overview of the Laravel queue worker and how it compares to the SQSD functionality. He then starts in on the code to create the daemon (outside of a framework) and adding in the while loop to keep it running as a daemon making use of the SQSD Worker class as a base. The post ends with some instructions on packaging up the command line tool using the phar functionality already included in the PHP language.

tagged: aws amazon sqsd queue elasticbeanstalk tutorial daemon worker

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/building-command-line-daemon-php-emulate-aws-sqsd/

Amazon Web Services:
PHP application logging with Amazon CloudWatch Logs and Monolog
Apr 24, 2017 @ 09:46:47

On the Amazon Web Services blog there's a new post showing you how to use the Monolog logging library and a custom AWS extension to ship your logs to Amazon CloudWatch quickly and easily.

Logging and information debugging can be approached from a multitude of different angles. Whether you use an application framework or coding from scratch it’s always comforting to have familiar components and tools across different projects. In our examples today, I am going to enable Amazon CloudWatch Logs logging with a PHP application. To accomplish this, I wanted to use an existing solution that is both already popular and well used, and that is standards compliant. For these reasons, we are going to use the open source log library, PHP Monolog (https://github.com/Seldaek/monolog).

They start by introducing the Monolog library for those not familiar with it and how it relates to the PSR-3 standard. The ultimate goal with their implementation is to allow for the logs to be shipped to CloudWatch and implement some alerting around them. The tutorial then kicks in and they show you how to use Composer to install Monolog and an add-on to interface with CloudWatch. Code is provided to set up the initial logger and how to have it to log messages to different places. They then move over to CloudWatch and define a filter for the JSON data to find successful logins to your application. They also show how to use this same functionality in a Laravel application, contained in a test route.

tagged: aws amazon logging cloudwatch monolog tutorial install usage filter

Link: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/developer/php-application-logging-with-amazon-cloudwatch-logs-and-monolog/

AWS Developer Blog:
Automating the Deployment of Encrypted Web Services with the AWS SDK for PHP (Pa
Feb 17, 2017 @ 12:25:48

The Amazon Web Services blog has posted the second part of their series covering the automated deployment of encrypted web services with the AWS SDK. In this new tutorial (part two, part one is here) they continue with the deployment of services: AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon Route 53 and Amazon CloudFront.

In the first post of this series, we focused on how to use Amazon Route 53 for domain registration and use Amazon Certificate Manager (ACM) to create SSL certificates. With our newly registered domain available for use, we can proceed to deploy and configure the services we need to host the www.dev-null.link website across an encrypted connection. Once complete, the infrastructure configuration will reflect the diagrams [included in the post].

The tutorial then walks you through each of the services you need to deploy and shares the code (using the AWS PHP SDK) to show how to automate the process. There's also a few screenshots included of various page results and admin UIs to help you be sure you're in the right place.

tagged: aws amazon deployment encrypted webservice sdk tutorial series part2

Link: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/developer/automating-the-deployment-of-encrypted-web-services-with-the-aws-sdk-for-php-part-2/

TutsPlus.com:
Programming With Yii2: Using Amazon S3
Dec 08, 2016 @ 11:27:16

The TutsPlus.com site has continued their series of posts in the "Programming with Yii2" series with this new tutorial covering the use of the Amazon S3 service for sorting files remotely in your application.

In today's tutorial, I'll walk you through the basics of browsing, uploading and downloading files to and from Amazon's cloud-based S3 storage service. Essentially, I've created a simple storage model and controller as examples which you can extend for your needs.

He starts with a brief introduction to the S3 service (including a video from Amazon themselves) and what kinds of things it could be used for. He helps you get started via the AWS web GUI, creating an S3 "bucket" and viewing their contents. He shows how to get the credentials you'll need to connect to the bucket and defining them in the ini configuration file. The tutorial then shows how to use this AWS extension for Yii2 to connect to and work with the S3 bucket you've created. This includes browsing the content, uploading new files and downloading current ones.

tagged: yii2 framework series amazon s3 file storage download upload tutorial

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/programming-with-yii2-using-amazon-s3--cms-26347

Ben Ramsey:
Building PHP Projects on AWS CodeBuild
Dec 05, 2016 @ 10:54:48

Ben Ramsey has a post to his site sharing the process he's worked up to deploy PHP applications on AWS Codebuild, a new service from Amazon Web Services that fills the niche for an easy to spin up and use build server.

The main highlight of re:Invent is always the keynotes and the new services and features announcements they make during the keynotes. One of the new services caught my attention, and I decided to give it a try. That service is AWS CodeBuild.

CodeBuild is designed to be used as part of the AWS CodePipeline, but it may also be used by itself. [...] Out of the box, CodeBuild provides some managed images that you may use to build your projects. These include environments for Android, Java, Python, Ruby, Golang, and Node.js. PHP is missing from this list, but since you’re able to use other images, I decided to see how easy it is to get up and running on CodeBuild with a PHP project. I chose to try out my ramsey/uuid library for a simple test.

He walks you through the creation of a new CodeBuild instance (complete with screenshots of the UI) and how to configure your project, explaining each of the settings as he goes. He includes the full build command he's using for the library running tests, a lint check and codesniffer checks for formatting. He shows how to get the project to build and what the UI will show when the build is successful (all green).

tagged: project aws codebuild pipeline library tutorial setup build server amazon

Link: https://benramsey.com/blog/2016/12/aws-codebuild-php/

Chris White:
Avoiding the burden of file uploads
Jun 14, 2016 @ 09:18:59

Chris White has a post to his site sharing a method he's come up with to avoid the burden of file uploads in your PHP application with the help of the offerings of Amazon S3 and some creative coding.

Handling file uploads sucks. Code-wise it's a fairly simple task, the files get sent along with a POST request and are available server-side in the $_FILES super global. Your framework of choice may even have a convenient way of dealing with these files, probably based on Symfony's UploadedFile class. Unfortunately it's not that simple.

[...] For most situations using S3 is a no brainer, but the majority of developers transfer their user's uploads to S3 after they have received them on the server side. This doesn't have to be the case, your user's web browser can send the file directly to an S3 bucket. You don't even have to open the bucket up to the public. Signed upload URLs with an expiry will allow temporary access to upload a single object.

He points out two advantages of this method: that you don't have to handle the upload part of file uploads and that it gives the user more control. He shares a video of the end result (a simple file upload frontend) and the code that you'll need to use the AWS PHP SDK to make it all work together. There's some configuration changes that'll need to be made on the S3 bucket side (like for CORS) but the code itself to make the connection is relatively simple. He does a great job of explaining every step of the way and includes the Javascript needed for the frontend as well.

tagged: file upload amazon s3 aws tutorial frontend

Link: https://cwhite.me/avoiding-the-burden-of-file-uploads/

Liip Blog:
Testing in the Cloud – Using Bamboo with Amazon AWS
Jun 08, 2016 @ 14:51:19

On the Liip blog there's a new post showing you how to set up "testing in the cloud" with the help of AWS and a Bamboo instance along with some custom configuration.

Bamboo is the continous integration service by Atlassian, the company owning the code management service Bitbucket (as well as the Jira issue tracker and Confluence wiki). Bamboo can run test suites and build any kind of artefact like generated documentation or installable packages. It integrates with Amazon Web Services, allowing to spin up EC2 instances as needed.

The article talks about the permissioning needed for the EC2 AWS instances and how to trigger automatic builds. They then get into the details of configuring the test runner and the PHPUnit setup to allow for the execution of your tests.

tagged: testing cloud aws bamboo amazon ec2 instance atlassian

Link: https://blog.liip.ch/archive/2016/06/08/testing-cloud-using-bamboo-with-amazon-aws.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Running an Elastic LAMP Stack on AWS
Mar 15, 2016 @ 11:54:38

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial from Daniel Berman giving you a step by step guide to setting up an Elastic LAMP stack on AWS, the Amazon Web Services platform using Zend Server.

This article introduces what is probably one of the simplest ways of setting up and running an elastic LAMP stack on the cloud – using Zend Server on AWS.

More specifically, the workflow described here includes launching a pre-configured AWS CloudFormation template that sets up all the components of a LAMP stack: Zend Server’s certified PHP stack plus all of Zend Server’s add-on features (including Z-Ray), a MySQL database, a Zend Server elastic group consisting of additional Zend Server instances, an elastic load balancer, and other pre-configured security definitions. This article is perfect for those contemplating moving their production environment to the cloud or those who already have one set up on AWS.

He starts with some of the basics: what Zend Server is and what role CloudFormation plays in the deployment process. The rest of the tutorial is broken up into several steps of the setup and deployment process:

  • Step 1: Launching the stack
  • Step 2: Managing the stack
  • Step 3: Deploying an application
  • Step 4: Monitoring the stack

They include screenshots of the web-based interfaces you'll use to complete each of these steps, giving you a great visual guide to where you should be and what things should look like. In the end you'll have a simple application, running in AWS on Zend Server you can easily monitor and configure.

tagged: zendserver tutorial elastic aws amazon webservices setup configure guide

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/running-an-elastic-lamp-stack-on-aws/

Zend:
Debugging WordPress with Zend Server and Z-Ray on AWS
Aug 05, 2015 @ 11:57:02

The Zend.com blog has a post showing you how to debug WordPress running on Zend Server with the help of the Z-Ray plugin. In their example they're hosting it on an AWS instance, but the same technique can apply on any other hosted version as well.

More and more PHP development is being done in the cloud and on virtual platforms nowadays. The workflow detailed in this brief tutorial is just one way to develop PHP in these environments, but it illustrates just how easy and productive this type of development can be. More specifically, it demonstrates how to launch the newly available Zend Server 8.5 instance on AWS with a WordPress application already deployed, and then use Z-Ray to introspect and debug the code.

The tutorial walks you through the setup and configuration of a new AWS instance with Zend Server and WordPress installed (you can skip to the end if you already have this). They show you how to:

  • Launch the Zend Server AWS instance
  • Configure the instance to install WordPress as a part of the setup process
  • Access the Zend Server control panel
  • Accessing the WordPress application deployed on the instance

Once the WordPress application is accessed, the Z-Ray inspection bar will appear at the bottom giving you insight into various configuration options, performance metrics and server information. They also link to a video with more information about the WordPress plugin.

tagged: zendserver wordpress aws amazon instance zray debug tutorial install configure

Link: http://blog.zend.com/2015/08/04/debugging-wordpress-with-zend-server-and-z-ray-on-aws