Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Matt Stauffer:
"Strict" mode and other MySQL customizations in Laravel 5.2
Feb 29, 2016 @ 10:47:24

In a new post to his site Matt Stauffer revisits the topic of "strict" mode with MySQL and Laravel with some customizations you can make around how your application uses it.

If you remember my post How To Disable MySQL Strict Mode on Laravel Forge (Ubuntu), you'll remember that MySQL 5.7 introduced something we've been casually calling "strict mode," which is really a combination of new modes that, in sum, make MySQL process your queries a little more strictly than before.

In my previous post I showed how to disable it on Ubuntu, but since then, Adam Wathan has added a feature to Laravel that allows you to define whether you're using "strict" mode and also allows you to customize exactly which modes you'd like enabled--all in code.

He briefly goes back over what the "strict" in "strict mode" means for your database and application, including a list of the set of modes it contains (essentially a grouping of modes). He then shows how to use the new feature to enable/disable it in a Laravel (5.2+) application through the database configuration. You can also get more in-depth and enable/disable individual modes that the "strict" mode contains if you need a bit more custom handling.

tagged: strict mode mysql customize laravel mysql example configuration

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/strict-mode-and-other-mysql-customizations-in-laravel-5-2

Sylius Blog:
Sending configurable e-mails in Symfony
Oct 05, 2015 @ 11:15:46

In a post to the Sylius blog Mateusz Zalewski shows you how to create configurable emails in your Symfony-based application with help from a custom bundle they've released to help make it a much simpler process.

Every developer, during their adventure with PHP programming has been struggling with sending emails in a web application. However using PHP send() function is often insufficient for common web applications, when you need templates, variables, configurations etc.Fortunately, Sylius provides SyliusMailerBundle and Mailer component, with some awesome features. [...] Of course, this bundle and component are fully decoupled and can be used in any Symfony application.

They walk you through the installation (via Composer) and configuration of the bundle, adding it's dependencies to the kernel of your application. He shows how to configure the container with connection information (like the name and from values) and update your database with the tool's migrations. From there he shows how to customize your emails, making use of the Twig template handling to define the body contents. The bundle also makes it possible to define custom email types with different settings for each. Finally they show how to send the emails, grabbing the sender information and sending the email, either more manually or via a custom defined email type.

tagged: symfony email configurable tutorial bundle customize template sender

Link: http://sylius.org/blog/sending-configurable-e-mails-in-symfony

Matthew Turland:
Customizing Codeception Database Cleanup
May 12, 2014 @ 11:15:24

If you're a Codeception user, you'll find Matthew Turland's latest post interesting. In it he shares a way to customize database cleanup between the tests. Codeception handles it a bit differently that how PHPUnit's Db module does.

Recently, I was looking into ways to speed up the runtime of the test suite at Blopboard. We use the Codeception framework to write functional tests for our REST API, part of which entails putting the database into a known state using Codeception’s Db module. The behavior of this module is similar to that of the PHPUnit Database extension with one exception: where PHPUnit only truncates tables and leaves their schemas intact, Codeception removes the database structure and expects the SQL dump it uses to recreate it between tests. I must admit to not understanding this design decision of Codeception, nor attempts to clarify it.

He admits that his solution is "a bit hacky" but it does work to truncate the table rather than drop the entire schema and wait for a rebuild. His "DbHelper" class is used in place of the Db module. He traced through the execution path of the Db module and found a "hook" where he could override the "cleanup" method to prevent the schema drop and replace it with a truncate. He also includes code for a suggested addition to Codception that would handle the same thing in a more integrated way.

tagged: customize database cleanup codeception tutorial schema truncate phpunit

Link: http://matthewturland.com/2014/05/09/customizing-codeception-database-cleanup

ServerGrove Blog:
How to customize the error pages in Symfony2
Oct 28, 2010 @ 13:25:34

On the ServerGrove blog there's a new post showing you how to customize those default error pages that show up in a Symfony2 application when an exception is thrown.

The framework produces a very detailed report when in the development environment. However, when you put the application in the production server, you will need to display a user friendly page. Creating a custom page is actually simple. All you need to do is define a controller/action pair that will generate the response. You can either use an existing controller or create one specifically to handle errors.

They include a sample "lean" controller to just handle the output for the exceptions as well as a template to go with it that just has a basic customized message and a status code for the exception. Using it is simple - just add an "exception_listener" setting to your configuration file to point at the new controller.

tagged: customize tutorial error output symfony2

Link:

PHPBuilder.com:
Customize Your WordPress Blog with PHP Plugins and Widgets
Mar 15, 2010 @ 14:51:34

On PHPBuilder.com today there's a new tutorial walking you through the creation of a simple WordPress plugin that shows the latest YouTube video from your blog's channel.

Think of plugins as components where you put your functionality and widgets as components of your user interface. Building your own WordPress plugins and widgets will make your blog truly original, and all you need is basic PHP and HTML knowledge - and your imagination.

They help you get started with defining a few constants, registering the actions with WordPress, building the widget (with complete cut-and-paste-able code) and including it in your WordPress blog. You can download the complete source if you want to get started quickly.

tagged: wordpress plugin widget tutorial customize

Link:

Symfony Blog:
New in symfony 1.2: Customize the Web Debug Toolbar
Aug 27, 2008 @ 08:49:50

The Symfony blog points out a handy feature included with the latest release of the framework - a web debugging toolbar that gives you a quick summary of the stats for the current page.

The symfony web debug toolbar is one of the developer best friend. It is always conveniently accessible in the browser when using the development environment. It gives you everything you need to know about the current page and ease the debugging of your applications. Until now, all the information available in this toolbar were hardcoded. But as of symfony 1.2, the web debug toolbar is entirely configurable.

The toolbar contains information like: the version of the framework you're using, cache information, logging, memory usage and the execution time of the page. They also include a bit on how to customize your toolbar, adding and removing panels from the bar as well as changing up the look with styles.

tagged: symfony framework debug toolbar customize

Link:

ProDevTips Blog:
Extending Zend DB Table
Jun 20, 2008 @ 09:44:58

On the ProDevTips blog, there's a new post showing how to bend the Zend_Db table component of the Zend Framework to your will and customize parts of it for your application.

For some time now I've been working on an administrative backend system. I quickly found the need to extend DB Table with more stuff than needed when I extended the Zend Framework, it's mostly convenience functions designed to reduce repetitive code snippets.

He illustrates with some of the custom override functions he's made including versions of updateOne, exists, fetchOne and fetchSomething.

tagged: extend zenddb component zendframework table customize

Link:

Daniel O'Connor's Blog:
How to customise PHP_CodeSniffer
Jun 13, 2008 @ 11:11:36

Daniel O'Connor has posted a quick guide to customizing your installation of the PHP_CodeSniffer PEAR package to match the coding standard you'd like.

PHP_CodeSniffer is a PEAR package which detects potential coding problems and enforces your style guide. The default is the PEAR coding standard, but you can easily change that.

His method requires the creation of a custom "FooCodingStandard.php" (named whatever you'd like, of course) that contains a class/method defining the "sniffs" you'd like to use for your standard. Use "pfm" to make it into a package and install it to your system - you'll be all set.

tagged: customize pear package phpcodesniffer sniff standard

Link:

Community News:
Yahoo! Launches SearchMonkey (Search Platform)
May 23, 2008 @ 12:09:40

At the Developer Tutorials blog mentions, a new offering from Yahoo! is making it simple to "spice up" the results for your site when someone searches for it - Yahoo! Searchmonkey. It's a PHP-based platform for creating an application that's returned inline with the search results.

Rasmus Lerdorf has an example of the potential output for a search returning a restaurant's name, links to its menu/wine list, reviews and a link to make a reservation.

There's lots of fun things to do with this tool - check out the developer page for more information and grab the developer tool to jump in and get started building your own custom result.

tagged: yahoo searchmonkey platform customize search result

Link:

DeveloperTutorials.com:
WordPress Customization
Jan 15, 2008 @ 08:48:00

The Developer Tutorials website has posted an article with a sort of beginner's guide to working with WordPress and its customization.

WordPress is a state-of-the-art semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability. [...] WordPress is what you use when you want to work with your blogging software, not fight it.

They briefly mention how to use the administrative interface for the tool, but focus mainly on the templating system. They talk about the structure of the themes and how to create your own inside it. There's even parts detailing the specific sections (like the header, the posts section and the sidebars).

tagged: wordpress customize template tutorial header sidebar post wordpress customize template tutorial header sidebar post

Link: