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Rob Allen:
Sending attachments in multipart emails with ZendMail
September 16, 2014 @ 09:18:09

Rob Allen has a new post today showing you how to use the ZendMail component of the Zend Framework 2 to send attachments with multipart emails. A multipart email allows you to combine both the HTML and plain text versions of the content into a single email.

I've written before about how to send an HTML email with a text alternative in ZendMail, but recently needed to send an attachment with my multipart email. With help from various sources on the Internet, this is how to do it.

He includes the full code for the example first: a "sendEmail" function that sets up the MIME and plain-text parts and uses the "MimeMessage" and "MimePart" objects to attach the file. He goes through each of the parts of the script and describes what's happening and how that changes the content of the email. You can find out more about the ZendMail component in this section on the Zend Framework manual.

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tutorial send email attachment multipart zendframework2 zendmail

Link: http://akrabat.com/zend-framework-2/sending-attachments-in-multipart-emails-with-zendmail/

Rob Allen:
Integrating ZF2 forms into Slim
August 26, 2014 @ 09:40:47

Rob Allen has a helpful post if you've ever wanted to take advantage of the simplicity of the Slim framework and the power of the Zend Framework 2 forms. In this latest post he walks you through the process of setting it all up and using the ZF2 elements outside of the main framework.

Let's say that you want to use Zend Framework 2′s Form component outside of ZF2 itself. In this case, a Slim application. It turns out that Composer makes this quite easy, though there's quite a lot of code involved, so this is a long article. Start with a really simple Slim Application...

His simple Slim application - just one route - handles both the GET and POST actions and uses several ZF2 components besides just the Form (dependencies mostly). He shows you the updates and additions you'll need to make to the service manager configuration and how to set up some custom validation and the form object in the controller. His example form only has two elements, an email field and a submit button and validation is done on the email address when it's submitted. Finally he includes the View object, extended from Slim's that combines some of the ZF2 and Slim handling to correctly render the form.

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form integration slim zendframework2 tutorial validation

Link: http://akrabat.com/zend-framework-2/integrating-zf2-forms-into-slim/

Rob Allen:
Globally overriding validation messages for ZF2 forms
August 19, 2014 @ 10:46:27

Rob Allen has posted a quick hint about overriding validation messages in a Zend Framework v2 based application. This override is related to the output of a standard form and works globally instead of just on a single form.

One thing that I always do when creating a Zend Framework 2 form is override the validation messages for a number of validators - EmailAddress in particular. I recently decided that I should probably sort this one out once and be done with it. Turns out that it's quite easy assuming that you use the FormElementManger to instantiate your forms.

The post includes all the code you'll need to do the override: a custom validator example, the changes you'll need to make to the configuration and an example of a form that uses the custom handling. He explains each of the parts too, showing how they fit together in your module.

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zendframework2 override validation message form tutorial

Link: http://akrabat.com/zend-framework-2/globally-overriding-validation-messages-for-zf2-forms/

Master Zend Framework:
Easy Cache Configuration With StorageCacheAbstractServiceFactory
August 07, 2014 @ 14:46:54

The Master Zend Framework site has posted a tutorial centered around caching in Zend Framework 2 applications. In this new post Matthew Setter looks at using the StorageCacheAbstractServiceFactory to handle the configuration and management of caching. The method is already implemented in the skeleton ZF2 application, so it makes it even easier to get started.

If you've been playing with Zend Framework 2 for some time, specifically the ZF2 Skeleton Application, you still may not have come across some of the pre-registered service manager abstract factory options. As I was browsing through the Application module's module.config.php recently, I came across this snippet [setting up the StorageCacheAbstractServiceFactory]. It was at that point I wondered why I'd spent time setting up caching using other methods, when this approach was already there and seemed to do a lot of the heavy lifting for me. So in this week's tutorial, I'm going to take you through how to use it, working with the default configuration provided in the manual.

He shows how to update the default configuration for the caching service including the caching type (the technology) and the configuration options to use. He mentions the kinds of caching available and provides a more "real world" example. This example uses the Laravel Homestead VM and a simple Redis server as the caching datastore. He sets up the configuration and shows how to access the caching service in both the controller and via dependency injection. He finishes off with a few lines of code showing how to use the caching to check for an item and, if not found, add it to the dataset.

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zendframework2 tutorial cache configuration storagecacheabstractfactory

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/servicemanager/storage-cache-abstract-service-factory-easy-cache-configuration

Master Zend Framework:
Accessing ServiceManager Services in Controller Plugins
July 31, 2014 @ 09:43:49

Matthew Setter has posted another new tutorial to his Master Zend Framework site today showing you how to access ServiceManager services in controller plugins. Controller plugins are a Zend Framework feature that allows certain events to trigger the plugin code during the lifetime of the controller.

I've seen some questions on Google+ and StackOverflow of late, regarding how to get access to the Zend Framework 2 database adapter, along with other ServiceManager-defined services, in a custom controller plugin. This type of setup can come in handy for a number of situations. You may want to access services such as caching, logging or databases and want to provide a simple interface for doing so. People seem really interested in how to do it, but how to get access to services from the ServiceManager doesn't seem to be as clear as it could be. Gladly, there's not much involved in actually doing it.

He shows you how to create a plugin for an existing module, creating the two needed classes and adding a new function to configure it. He starts with the plugin factory that can be used to generate an instance of the plugin. Next is the plugin class itself that extends the abstract plugin and controller plugin classes. The required database adapter is injected into it via a constructor injection. Finally, in the Module.php configuration, he creates a "getControllerPluginConfig" method that registers the new plugin and points to its class. A screencast is also provided showing the active development of the code.

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servicemanager plugin controller tutorial access zendframework2

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/servicemanager/accessing-servicemanager-services-controller-plugins

Master Zend Framework:
How to view an Instagram Photo Stream in Zend Framework 2
July 09, 2014 @ 10:53:59

On the Master Zend Framework site Matthew Setter has a new tutorial showing how to pull in Instagram photo feeds in a Zend Framework 2 application via their on developer functionality.

In today's tutorial, we're going to learn how to retrieve and display an Instagram photo stream in Zend Framework 2. We're going to cover the essentials of adding the libraries we'll need to composer.json, handling authentication and then retrieving and displaying our photo stream in a controller action. We'll be doing all of this by using composer to create a new Zend Framework 2 project, based on the ZF2 Skeleton App project and then add a new controller and action which will handle the work involved.

The tutorial uses a basic skeleton application and a PHP Instagram library to make the connection to their API. He shows you how to register your application with Instagram and set up the OAuth configuration to handle the authorization process. He walks you through the creation of the controller, setup of session support and the creation of a "photosAction" to view the results of the photo feed pull. He includes a screenshot of what the end result should look like with it all up and working.

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zendframework2 tutorial instagram photo feed api

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/api/view-instagram-photo-stream

Master Zend Framework:
Change Layout in Controllers and Actions in Zend Framework 2
June 27, 2014 @ 10:07:20

Matthew Setter has a new post to his Master Zend Framework site today showing you how to change layouts in controllers and actions for a Zend Framework v2 based application.

In Zend Framework 2, if you want to change the layout just for one action or for every action in a controller, how do you do it? How do you do it without overriding the layout for every action throughout the entire application? In today's post, based on an excerpt from Zend Framework 2 for Beginners, we see how to achieve both of these requirements.

He talks about the framework's use of the two-step view pattern and what the "template_map" definition usually looks like in a default ZF2 application. He shows three different ways to do the view switching from the controller or action:

  • Override the default layout in your module
  • Override the layout per/action
  • Override the layout per/controller

Each of these comes with a bit of code showing you how to make it work. They move from simplest to more complex, with the layout per controller being the most complex. It's not that it's difficult, it's just that there's more involved to make it work. You can either do it at the controller level or at the module level.

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tutorial zendframework2 controller action change ayout

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/views/change-layout-controllers-actions-zend-framework-2

Master Zend Framework:
Using the ClassMap Autoloader for Better Performance
June 19, 2014 @ 11:18:29

Matthew Setter has a new post to his Master Zend Framework site today with a recommendation on how you can use a classmap in your autoloader to reduce the time it takes "searching" for the files it needs.

Zend Framework 2′s been critiqued many times as being slow, at least slower than some of the other leading PHP frameworks. And to be fair, sometimes it's true. But it doesn't need to be and there are simple things you can do to improve performance of your applications. So this post will be the first in a multi-part series looking at ways in which you can improve the performance of your Zend Framework 2 application, with only a minimum of effort. Today, we're looking at the 2 autoloaders which are available in Zend Framework 2; these being the StandardAutoloader and ClassMapAutoloader.

He briefly introduces the concept of autoloaders and the PSR-0 standard that helped to bring a more unified method for their handling. He then gets into examples of using each of the two autoloader types. The Standard version (a fallback if nothing else is set up) resolves things based on a file path and locating classes in the right namespaces. The ClassMap autoloader does this mapping ahead of time and matches a path to a namespace+class. He includes code snippets showing how to set each of them up and a few statistics (using Apache's ab tool) of the difference in performance.

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zendframework2 tutorial autoloader classmap standard performance

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/performance-2/classmap-autoloader

Master Zend Framework:
Create a Simple File Upload Form in Zend Framework 2
June 04, 2014 @ 11:51:06

On his "Master Zend Framework" site today Matthew Setter has a new tutorial showing you how to create a simple file upload through the forms handling in Zend Framework 2. The form will include three parts: an input filter, a form class and a controller action to request to show the resulting form.

Having trouble getting file uploads integrated into your forms in Zend Framework 2? Or are you just curious about how to do it, and you want a quick rundown? If either of these is you, come walk through today's post with me as I show you a simple example of how it's done - along with how to combine it with filters and validators. Before we get started, I could have composed the code in a much shorter form than have I've composed it. But my assumption is that you're likely using the full-stack framework.

He includes summaries describing each of the three parts of the setup and the code you'll need to create each. The validator checks for things like "too big", "too small" and the correct MIME type on the file given. The form itself only includes the file upload element with a description of "Attachment". The controller action creates the form instance and calls an "isValid" when the upload happens to execute the validation. He also throws in the view template to display the form itself.

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zendframework2 simple file upload tutorial form

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/forms-2/simple-file-upload-form

Master Zend Framework:
Creating Custom ZFTool Diagnostic Classes
May 21, 2014 @ 11:23:59

Continuing on from his previous post introducing you to the ZFTool for Zend Framework 2 applications, Matthew Setter has posted part two of the series focusing on the creation of custom diagnostic classes for the tool.

In this week's tutorial, we're going to see how to step beyond the in-built classes and write our own custom checks. Specifically, we're going to write a check which runs php lint on the module's config file, module.config.php. The reason for doing this is because this file is so important in the configuration of a ZF2 module, that we should have a helpful sanity check for it.

He starts by helping you get all the needed dependencies in place, the ZFTool and ZendDiagnostics modules, installed via Composer. He includes code to help get started on the new diagnostic class and accompanying files. He implements some required methods from an interface, and shows how to enable its checking and define the configuration file. He includes a screenshot of the output so you can ensure things are working as they should be.

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zendframework2 zftool custom diagnostic class tutorial

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/zftool-2/creating-a-custom-zftool-diagnostic-class


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